Honduras

Protection International and CEJIL applaud the efforts to pass a law protecting human rights defenders, journalists and justice operators in Honduras

During a conference with civil society

Tegucigalpa, Honduras, Thursday, August 7, 2014- People who defend human rights, as well as journalists and justice operators, face a grave situation of risk in Honduras. Both the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and the United Nations ex-Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders, Margaret Sekaggye, have expressed their concern for this distinct type of persistent attacks: among them murders, threats, kidnappings, harassment, raids and robbery occurring in headquarters of organizations, as well as the criminalization of the human rights defenders. The Inter-American Court of Human Rights has also seen this context of risk in its judgments in the cases of Kawas Fernández and Luna López vs. Honduras.

Thu, 08/07/2014

Conferencia de prensa CEJIL y Protección InternacionalTegucigalpa, Honduras, Thursday, August 7, 2014- People who defend human rights, as well as journalists and justice operators, face a grave situation of risk in Honduras. Both the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and the United Nations ex-Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders, Margaret Sekaggye, have expressed their concern for this distinct type of persistent attacks: among them murders, threats, kidnappings, harassment, raids and robbery occurring in headquarters of organizations, as well as the criminalization of the human rights defenders. The Inter-American Court of Human Rights has also seen this context of risk in its judgments in the cases of Kawas Fernández and Luna López vs. Honduras.

Due to this grave situation, the cited bodies of protection and the Human Rights Council (Consejo de Derechos Humanos) recommended through the Universal Periodic Review (Examen Periódico Universal) the State of Honduras to create a mechanism for the protection of human rights defenders, as well as of journalists and social communicators.

In this sense, on June 4, the Congress of the Republic of Honduras approved in first debate the project named “Protection Law for defenders of Human Rights, Journalists, Social Communicators and Operators of Justice,” that looks to comply with the cited recommendations. Unfortunately, however, said project presents a variety of deficiencies that could impede compliance with the pursued objective.

Facing this situation, Protection International (PI) and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) conducted a joint mission to Tegucigalpa from July 28 to August 2. During the mission, the organizations expressed some concerns about the approved project to representatives of the Executive Power and the Honduran Congress. At the same time, they accompanied local organizations in the reflection and elaboration of reform proposals that would strengthen the mentioned mechanism.

“All public policies related to the protection of human rights defenders and journalists should be consulted with civil society and subject to a good technical analysis. If this does not happen, these public policies can be inapplicable, and would therefore not obtain the expected benefits,” stated the President of PI on the issue.

Marcia Aguiluz, CEJIL Program Director for Central America and Mexico noted that, “the State of Honduras is obligated to consider the international standards on the protection of human rights defenders and should also reach an agreement with the various groups that are in a situation of risk about the implementation of mechanisms that respond to their needs in an effective way.”

PI and CEJIL applaud and are thankful for the authorities’ willingness to listen to the suggestions for improvements to the initiative. Likewise, they reiterate the call to consider the contributions of various sectors of civil society so that the mechanism that aims for the protection of human rights defenders, journalists and operators of justice is a product of a broad, inclusive, transparent and participative process.

Press contact

Daniela Araya

daraya@cejil.org

+506 22807473

Again Honduras does not comply with protection measures granted by the IACHR

Another beneficiary of precautionary measures is murdered

San Jose, May 5, 2014. Yesterday, May 4, Mr. Orlando Orellana, president of the Patronato de la Comunidad de Cerrito Lindo (Community Leaders of Cerrito Lindo) in Sand Pedro Sula, Honduras was murdered. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) had granted Mr. Orellana precautionary measures (protection measures).

Mon, 05/05/2014

Foto Ilustrativa Honduras, con créditosSan Jose, May 5, 2014. Yesterday, May 4, Mr. Orlando Orellana, president of the Patronato de la Comunidad de Cerrito Lindo (Community Leaders of Cerrito Lindo) in Sand Pedro Sula, Honduras was murdered. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) had granted Mr. Orellana precautionary measures (protection measures).

The events occurred around 12:50 P.M. when Mr. Orellana was on his way to a meeting on how to handle matters related to his community. At that time, two unknown subjects approached him in a taxi and shot at Mr. Orellana several times killing him.

The IACHR granted the Cerrito Lindo community precautionary measures in 2005 due to a request made by the Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación de la Compañía de Jesús (ERIC) and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL). The measures were granted due to a number of violent acts committed against members of the community stemming from a dispute on the property they occupied.

According to the villagers, their property lots were illegally sold to them by a local company. Becoming aware of the illegality in the buying and selling of the property, the inhabitants began a series of legal activities and protests to resolve the situation of the lots they had bought in good faith. The complaints unleashed a series of attacks against the members of the Cerrito Lindo colony, including violent evictions, death threats, people being followed and murders.

In effect, including the death of Mr. Orellana, there have been seven murders of community members under the precautionary measures including: Paulino Herníquez, murdered March 17, 2004; Jonni Orlando Aceituno Varela, murdered June 18, 2004; Héctor José Ulloa and Gilmar Santiafo Mejía, run over in suspicious and unclear circumstances on March 27, 2004, and January 26, 2006, respectively; Eligio Mejía, murdered February 5, 2006; and Orfilia Amparo Mejía, murdered March 26, 2012. None of these deaths have been clarified nor have they had effective measures of protection implemented.

“The situation in Honduras is insolent and the lack of protection of those who defend human rights is evident. The State of Honduras is internationally responsible for its failure in its duty to protect the Cerrito Lindo community members as well as for its failure to investigate these regrettable events,” stated Marcia Aguiluz, CEJIL’s Program Director for Central America and Mexico.

In addition, it is particularly concerning that in less than one month, two beneficiaries of precautionary measures have been murdered. It is also worth recalling the violent murder on April 11 of Carlos Mejía Orellana, the Radio Progreso collaborator.

CEJIL urges the state authorities to comply with their duty to exercise due diligence and to adopt all the necessary measures to investigate the events as well as to identify those responsible. At the same time, CEJIL reiterates its call for the adoption of an adequate mechanism for the protection of human rights defenders that includes beneficiaries of measures of protection granted by the bodies of the Inter-American Human Rights System.

Photo credit: El Heraldo

Related Links: CEJIL regrets the murder of a Radio Progreso’s worker in Honduras

Press Contact

Daniela Araya

+506 22807473

daraya@cejil.org

 

 

CEJIL regrets the murder of a Radio Progreso´s worker in Honduras

The victim was a beneficiary of the IACHR´s precautionary measures

San Jose, Monday, April 14, 2014. The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) regrets the tragic death of Carlos Mejía Orellana, marketing manager at Radio Progreso in Honduras, Friday, April 11, 2014.

Mon, 04/14/2014

Fotografía Ilustrativa Radio Progreso, créditos reservadosSan Jose, Monday, April 14, 2014. The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) regrets the tragic death of Carlos Mejía Orellana, marketing manager at Radio Progreso in Honduras, Friday, April 11, 2014.

Between 10 and 11PM, Carlos Mejía was brutally murdered at his house in the city of El Progreso, located in the Yoro department in Honduras. The motives and circumstances for the crime are still not clear; however, his lifeless body was found with multiple stabs to the chest.

Along with 18 other Radio Progreso contributors, Mejía was a beneficiary of protection measures from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rigthts (IACHR). These measures were adopted by the Commission due to the numerous threats and harassment received by the members of the radio station. In Carlos Mejía’s case, the IACHR adopted the measures May 27, 2011 and ordered the State of Honduras to make every necessary effort to protect his life and personal integrity. Unfortunately, the authorities did not establish effective security measures nor did they investigate the reported threats.

Marcia Aguiluz, CEJIL’s Program Director for Central America and Mexico, declared that, “it is fundamental that the Honduran authorities answer the calls made by the international organs of protection and that they comply with their obligation to guarantee the life and integrity of those in risk. In the face of these regrettable events, the State should comply with its duty of due diligence and clarify the events as soon as possible.”

CEJIL expresses its sympathy to all of Radio Progreso’s colleagues and contributors for this regrettable loss. At the same time, CEJIL calls upon the State of Honduras to conduct a prompt, appropriate and diligent investigation with the objective to identify, prosecute and punish all the perpetrators and masterminds responsible for the murder of Carlos Mejía. Finally, CEJIL asks for an agreement to be reached on the measures of security required for the other Radio Progreso contributors who are also beneficiaries of the protection measures.

Press Contact

Daniela Araya

+506 22807473

daraya@cejil.org


CEJIL calls on the Honduran authorities to elect an independent National Human Rights Commissioner

The selection process must be transparent

Tegucigalpa and San Jose, Tuesday, February 11, 2014. The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) calls on the National Congress of Honduras to elect a competent, honorable, and independent National Human Rights Commissioner (Comisionado o Comisionada Nacional de los Derechos Humanos, CONADEH).

Wed, 03/12/2014

Tegucigalpa and San Jose, Tuesday, February 11, 2014. The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) calls on the National Congress of Honduras to elect a competent, honorable, and independent National Human Rights Commissioner (Comisionado o Comisionada Nacional de los Derechos Humanos, CONADEH).

The current Commissioner’s term will end March 14, thus a replacement must be selected in the following days. For this purpose, public hearings will be held this week before the Honduran Congress’s Special Multi-Party Commission (Comisión Especial Multipartidaria del Congreso de Honduras).

“In order to guarantee the election of a person with the best capabilities, there should be a rigorous evaluation of the candidates’ competency, repute, and integrity. Such characteristics are an endorsement for justice for those who consider themselves victims of the abuse of power and also for the denounced organizations or individuals, providing an objective evaluation that respects the rules and procedures,” stated Marcia Aguiluz, CEJIL’s Program Director for Central America and Mexico.

This process is of particular importance for Honduras due to the discretization of CONADEH’s work nationally and internationally in recent years. In fact, the International Coordinating Committee of National Institutions for the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights lowered the international ranking of Honduran ombudsmen. The Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the human rights violations in Honduras since the coup d’état on June 28, 2009, stated that the Commission’s current measures have been insufficient, negligent, or directly incompatible with its mandate.

In this sense, the Honduran Congress has an opportunity to restore the credibility of the CONADEH and help it fulfill its mandate as the top body responsible for upholding respect for and guarantee of human rights in Honduras.

CEJIL joins Honduran civil society organizations in urging the authorities to guarantee a transparent and public process, permitting wide participation for all the sectors of society. These conditions, in addition to a rigorous evaluation of the most qualified candidates free of political influence, are paramount to ensure the selection of a person demonstrating the competence and integrity necessary to successfully guide the national institution for the protection of human rights.

Press Contact

Daniela Araya

+506 22807473

daraya@cejil.org

 

 

 

CEJIL condemns the assassination of Honduran judge and demands investigation

The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) condemns the assassination of Judge Mireya Mendoza, who was a judge of the Trial Court in the city of El Progreso, Honduras, and who also was the Assistant Secretary of the Board of the Association of Judges for Democracy (AJD).

 

Judge Mendoza was assassinated on July 24, 2013, around noon, while she was driving her vehicle. Unknown subjects shot her about 20 times.

Mon, 07/29/2013

San José, July 29, 2013

The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) condemns the assassination of Judge Mireya Mendoza, who was a judge of the Trial Court in the city of El Progreso, Honduras, and who also was the Assistant Secretary of the Board of the Association of Judges for Democracy (AJD).

Judge Mendoza was assassinated on July 24, 2013, around noon, while she was driving her vehicle. Unknown subjects shot her about 20 times.

The assassination of the Judge has not been the only one against justice operators in this country.  In 2010, Judge Olga Mariné Laguna was killed, and on May 27, 2011, Raúl Enrique Reyes Carbajal was also killed. He was the coordinator in Honduras for the Public Prosecutor in Puerto Cortes, and only days before taking office he had been the Prosecutor against Organized Crime in San Pedro Sula.

For its part, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), in the year 2011 when it published its Second Report on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders, expressed its concern regarding the 22 Honduran judges who signaled that they had been threatened to death because they dealt with delicate cases related to organized crime, youth groups, or gangs.

Also, the context of impunity that prevails in Honduras is worrisome. Recently, the former Attorney General, Luis Rubí, declared before the National Congress that 80% of homicides committed in the country are left in impunity due to the investigation bodies’ lack of capacity.

Nevertheless, the Honduran State has the legal duty to investigate violations to the right of life. In this sense, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights has established that States should “commence ex officio and without delay, a serious, fair, and effective investigation (…) with all available means and should be designed to establish the truth and to investigate, prosecute, and punish all the persons who are liable for the facts”.

“The assassination of Judge Mendoza is extremely worrisome because of the inevitable chilling effect on all those persons who are committed to the search for justice. If there is no investigation and punishment of all those responsible- both material and intellectual-, the State would be tolerating these acts and with that it would intimidate the independent and impartial work of judges and other justice operators” declared Marcia Aguiluz, CEJIL’s Program Director for Central America and Mexico.

CEJIL calls upon the Honduran authorities to assign all the necessary resources to effectively investigate the assassination of Judge Mireya Mendoza and punish those responsible. We also insist that the authorities create a protection mechanism for justice operators with the objective of preventing this type of crime and fully guaranteeing judicial independence.

Contact in Costa Rica

Marcia Aguiluz

Program Director for Central America and Mexico

Tel. (506) 2280-7473 / 7608

 

Foto crédito: Asociación de Jueces por la Democracia

Jeannette Kawas / Honduras

Jeannette Kawas Jeannette Kawas was a Honduran environmental activist assassinated in 1995 due to her work to stop illegal deforestation and to protect the state of the environment in the Tela bay region, on the Caribbean coast of Honduras.

Her death was the first in a series of acts of aggression, threats and executions against Honduran environmentalists.

She created and, until her death, presided over the Foundation for the Protection of Lancetilla, Punta Sal, Punta Izopo and Texiguat (PROLANSATE). From that position, she denounced the intentions of people and businesses for their involvement in illegal activity in Punta Sal, the contamination of the lagoons and the deforestation of the forests in the region.

Under her leadership, PROLANSANTE advocated to the National Congress that Punta Sal be considered a National Park, denounced the illegal exploitation of the trees and the damaging of diverse protected zones; she also opposed the business projects that threatened the environment.

Days before she was assassinated, Jeannette organized a march in the city of Tela to protest the initiative of the government to grant property deeds in the Punta Sol National Park.

In the night of February 6, 1995, two armed men approached her at her home and shot her.  No one has been arrested for the crime.

In 2003, CEJIL and the Reflection, Investigation and Communication team from the Jesus Company in Honduras (ERIC) brought the case to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. In April of 2009, the Inter-American Human Rights Court condemned Honduras for violating the human rights of Jeannette Kawas.

The court concluded that the assassination of Mrs. Kawas occurred in a context of aggression and threats against people that defend the environment, and was a consequence of their job to protect the environment, which was interfering with strong economic interests. The sentence determined that the crime “was facilitated by the intervention of persons that acted under the direction of state agents.”

The decision of the Court ordered that the government clear up the circumstances around the death of the environmental activist, compensate the families, implement a national campaign that recognizes the importance of the work performed by people who defend the environment, and to construct a monument in memory of her in the Punta Sol National Park.

Civil Society Letter to President of the Permanent Council

Transparency in the OAS

Distinguished Ambassador Pary Rodríguez:

 

The signatory organizations address your office in order to express our concern about the lack of Civil Society participation in the above-mentioned process, an issue that we consider of great importance.

As already known to you, during the OAS General Assembly, which took place this past June in Cochabamba, Bolivia, the regional States approved Resolution AG/RES.2761 in which they welcomed the report of the Special Working Group to Reflect on the Workings of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights with a View to Strengthening the Inter-American Human Rights System.  Additionally, the Resolution instructed the Permanent Council, on the basis of the report, “to draw up proposals for its application in dialogue with all the parties involved,”[1] further providing that said proposals should be presented for consideration before a Special Session of the General Assembly no later than the first quarter of 2013.

 


Wed, 06/20/2012

Distinguished Ambassador Pary Rodríguez:

 

The signatory organizations address your office in order to express our concern about the lack of Civil Society participation in the above-mentioned process, an issue that we consider of great importance.

As already known to you, during the OAS General Assembly, which took place this past June in Cochabamba, Bolivia, the regional States approved Resolution AG/RES.2761 in which they welcomed the report of the Special Working Group to Reflect on the Workings of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights with a View to Strengthening the Inter-American Human Rights System.  Additionally, the Resolution instructed the Permanent Council, on the basis of the report, “to draw up proposals for its application in dialogue with all the parties involved,”[1] further providing that said proposals should be presented for consideration before a Special Session of the General Assembly no later than the first quarter of 2013.

In accordance with this mandate, the Permanent Council included this issue in its regular meeting this past June 28th, establishing the formal initiation of the process.  Several days later, the OAS Secretariat for External Relations, through its Department of International Affairs, publicly announced this decision, informing Civil Society that the “Permanent Council will hold informal meetings to define its methodology, work plan, agenda and the manner of consultation.”[2]

In this regard, the signatory organizations consider that the manner in which Civil Society participation has been incorporated into the discussions ordered by the General Assembly in its Resolution does not constitute a process of real and effective participation consistent with the principles the OAS has established on the issue.

The OAS has recognized on numerous occasions the importance of the participation of Civil Society organizations.  In fact, the Inter-American Democratic Charter reaffirms the principle that the promotion of Civil Society participation in OAS activities strengthens democratic institutions in the region; similarly and on the occasion of the 5th Summit of the Americas, held in Puerto España, the regional heads of State expressed their commitment to stimulating full participation of Civil Society in the Inter-American System (¶ 94).[3]

More recently, during the last General Assembly, the States of the region adopted Resolution AG/RES. 2736 (XLII-O/12),[4] in which they committed to broadening and guaranteeing dialogue with and participation of civil society through various means.

In light of the above and given the importance of the issue being discussed by the Permanent Council, namely the strengthening of the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights, the signatory organizations consider that the resulting process to be adopted must ensure adequate means, opportunities and forums so that the participation of Civil Society may be real and effective and guarantee a true dialogue amongst all parties involved.

In this sense, we respectfully appeal for the re-adoption of the standards fixed by the General Assembly with respect to Civil Society participation and that, at minimum, the following be guaranteed:

  • Transparent discussions at the regional level (within the Permanent Council or other instance at the OAS), as well as within the States;
  • Consultative procedures are implemented in the States, extending beyond country capitals particularly in larger countries where it may be more difficult for Civil Society to respond to invitations in the capital;
  • Recognition of the value of using resources from the Specific Fund to finance the participation of Civil Society organizations and other social actors in discussions about the issue of strengthening the Inter-American Commission  To contemplate and implement innovative methods, other than in-person interventions during the Permanent Council sessions that go beyond the formal circulation of documents.  Tools such as real-time long distance participation and live webcast transmissions of all discussions should be guaranteed as a minimum to enable informed contributions with respect to the various issues that are discussed
  • Ensure a dynamic that facilitates dialogue during meetings and in each of the debates established by the Permanent Council that would not only be by formal written participation.  It is clear that participation cannot be reduced to occasional moments, but rather must be ensured throughout the process, something which was not previously guaranteed in the procedures prior to the discussion of the Working Group report.  Given that the very same day the IACHR was still conducting hearings, numerous organizations and civil servants from various countries were unable to participate in the so-called dialogue[5]

Based on the aforementioned, we consider it critical that, as a minimum and prior to any substantive discussion on the issue, during the upcoming session of the Permanent Council, a methodology can be worked out that establishes means for disseminating information, a delineation of the various actors involved in the discussion on strengthening the Inter-American Commission, an identification of forums for real participation, as well as a calendar of meeting and events that will be held in Washington, as well as within the States during the coming months.

We wish to insist on the need to generate opportunities for effective participation on each of the discussion points and in each of the meetings held on this issue concerning the continuity of the Inter-American System for the protection of human rights.

The signatory organizations respectfully request that we be heard by the States and that our opinions and contributions be taken into account, not only when the recommendations of the Working Group report are discussed, but also when methodological and scheduling issues need to be resolved.

We thank you in advance for your attention and look forward to your response.

 

cc. José Miguel Insulza. Secretary General of the OAS.

cc. José de Jesús Orozco, President, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

 

Signatory Organizations

Regional

Amazon Watch

Amnistía Internacional

Asociación Interamericana para la Defensa del Ambiente (AIDA)

Campaña por una Convención Interamericana por los Derechos Sexuales y los Derechos Reproductivos

Centro por la Justicia y el Derecho Internacional (CEJIL)

Coalición LGBTTTI Trabajando en la OEA

Comité de América Latina y el Caribe por la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer (CLADEM)

Confluencia Feminista Mesoamericana Las Petateras

International Pregnancy Advisory Services (Servicios Internacionales de Asesoría sobre el Embarazo) IPAS – Centroamérica

Plataforma Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, Democracia y Desarrollo (PIDHDD)

Red latinoamericana y caribeña por la defensa de los derechos de los niños, niñas y adolescentes (Redlamyc)

Servicio Paz y Justicia en América Latina (SERPAJ – AL)

 

Bolivia

Oficina Jurídica Para la Mujer

 

Brasil

Grupo Tortura Nunca Mais - Rio de Janeiro

ISER- Instituto de Estudos da Religião

Chile

Corporación Humanas

 

Colombia

Colectivo de Abogados José Alvear Restrepo (CCAJAR)

Comisión Colombiana de Juristas (CCJ)

Corporación para la Defensa y Promoción de los Derechos Humanos REINICIAR

Grupo Interdisciplinario por los Derechos Humanos (GIDH)

Peace Brigades International - Colombia Project

 

Costa Rica

Alianza por tus Derechos

 

Ecuador

Acción Ecológica

Centro de Documentación en Derechos Humanos “Segundo Montes Mozo S. J.” (CSMM)

Comisión Ecuménica de Derechos Humanos (CEDHU)

Fundación Pachamama

 

El Salvador

Asociación Pro-Búsqueda de Niños y Niñas Desaparecidos (PROBUSQUEDA)

Comité de Familiares de Migrantes Fallecidos y Desaparecidos de El Salvador (COFAMIDE)

Fundación de Estudios para la Aplicación del Derecho (FESPAD)

Instituto de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad Centroamericana “José Simeón Cañas” (IDHUCA)

Instituto de Estudios de la Mujer "Norma Virginia Guirola de Herrera" (CEMUJER)

Organización de Mujeres Salvadoreñas (ORMUSA)

 

Estados Unidos

Human Rights Clinic, University of Texas

US Office on Colombia

Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA)

Guatemala

Fundación Myrna Mack, Guatemala

Instituto de Estudios Comparados en Ciencias Penales de Guatemala (ICCPG)

Movimiento Social por los Derechos de la Niñez, Adolescencia y Juventud en Guatemala (90 organizaciones)

Unidad de Protección a Defensoras y Defensores de Derechos Humanos

 

Honduras

Asociación Cooperación Técnica Nacional (CTN)

Asociación de Jueces por la Democracia (AJD)

Asociación LGTB Arco Iris

Asociación para una vida mejor de personas infectadas/afectadas por el VIH-Sida en Honduras (APUVIMEH)

Casa Alianza

Centro de Investigación para la Prevención de la Violencia

Centro de Investigación y Promoción de Derechos Humanos en Honduras (CIPRODEH)

Centro para la prevención, tratamiento y rehabilitación de las víctimas de tortura y sus familiares (CPTRT)

Coalición Nacional de Mujeres de Honduras (CONAMUH)

Colectiva de Mujeres Hondureñas (CODEMUH)

Comité de Derechos Humanos de Honduras (CODEH)

Comité por la Libre Expresión  (C-LIBRE), Honduras

Convergencia por los Derechos Humanos de la Zona Nor Occidental

Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación de la Compañía de Jesús (ERIC)

Foro de Mujeres por la Vida

Foro Nacional para las Migraciones de Honduras (FONAMIH)

Gran Alianza por OMOA

Movimiento de Mujeres por la Paz Visitación Padilla

Organización Fraternal Negra de Honduras (OFRANEH)

Tribuna de Mujeres contra los Femicidios

 

México

Abogadas y Abogados para la Justicia y los Derechos Humanos, A. C.

Acción Urgente para Defensores de los Derechos Humanos, A.C. (ACCUDEH)

Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña “Tlachinollan”, A.C. (Tlachinollan)

Centro de Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres, A. C.  (CEDHEM)

Centro de Derechos Humanos Fray Bartolomé de las Casas A.C.

Centro de Derechos Humanos Miguel Agustín Pro Juárez, A.C. (Prodh)

Centro Mexicano de Derecho Ambiental, A.C. (CEMDA)

Ciudadanos en Apoyo a los Derechos Humanos, A.C. (CADHAC)

Comisión de Solidaridad y Defensa de los Derechos Humanos, A.C. (COSYDDHAC)

Comité de Defensa Integral de Derechos Humanos Gobixha (Código DH)

Fundación para la Justicia y el Estado Democrático de Derecho

Grupo de Mujeres de San Cristóbal de las Casas, A.C.

i(dh)eas, Litigio Estratégico en Derechos Humanos, A.C. (IDHEAS)

Red Nacional de Organismos Civiles de Derechos Humanos "Todos los Derechos para Todas y Todos" integrada por 71 organizaciones en 21 estados de la República mexicana.

Servicios Legales e Investigación y Estudios Jurídicos (SLIEJ)

 

Nicaragua

Casa Alianza

Centro de Asistencia Legal a Pueblos Indígenas (CALPI)

Centro de Información y Servicios de Asesoría en Salud (SISAS)

Centro de Investigaciones de la Comunicación (CINCO)

Centro Nicaragüense de Derechos Humanos (CENIDH)

Comisión Permanente de Derechos Humanos (CPDH)

FIBRAS/Movimiento por Nicaragua

Movimiento Autónomo de Mujeres

Movimiento contra el abuso sexual

Movimiento Feminista de Nicaragua

Oficina de asistencia técnica para el desarrollo y la equidad (CIFEM), Nicaragua

Red de Mujeres contra la Violencia

Panamá

Alianza Ciudadana Pro Justicia, Panamá

Centro de Asistencia Legal Popular (CEALP)

Centro de Incidencia Ambiental (CIAM)

Centro de Iniciativas Democráticas (CIDEM)

Instituto de Derecho Agrario, Ambiental e Indígena

 

Paraguay

BASE Investigaciones Sociales,

Servicio Paz y Justicia (SERPAJ)

Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos del Paraguay (CODEHUPY)

 

Perú

Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (Aprodeh)

CEDAL-Centro de Derechos y Desarrollo

Coordinadora Nacional de Derechos Humanos

 

Uruguay

Instituto de Estudios Legales y Sociales del Uruguay (IELSUR)

 

Venezuela

Acción Solidaria en VIH/Sida

Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad Católica Andrés Bello

Civilis Derechos Humanos

Comité de Familiares de las Víctimas de los sucesos ocurridos entre el 27 de febrero y los primeros días de marzo de 1989 (COFAVIC)

Espacio Público

Programa Venezolano de Educación – Acción en Derechos Humanos (Provea)

Sinergia, Asociación Venezolana de Organizaciones de Sociedad Civil

Vicaría de Derechos Humanos de Caracas

 


[1] AG/RES. 2761 (XLII-O/12), Follow-up on the Recommendations Contained in the “Report of the Special Working Group to Reflect on the Workings of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights with a View to strengthening the Inter-American Human Rights System,” adopted at the fourth plenary session of the General Assembly in Bolivia, held on June 5, 2012.  Paragraph two establishes, “To instruct the Permanent Council, on the basis of the report, to draw up proposals for its application in dialogue with all the parties involved.”

[2] Email dated July 5, 2012 disseminated through the list osc_registradas@lists.oas.org by the Directorship of the Department of International Affairs, of the OAS Secretariat for External Relations, titled, “OEA - Consulta - Recomendaciones sobre el Funcionamiento de la CIDH y el Fortalecimiento del SIDH | OAS - Consultation - Recommendations on the Functioning of the IACHR and the Strengthening of the IASHR”.

[3] “We commit to continue encouraging the participation of our peoples, through the engagement of our citizens, communities and civil society in the design and execution of development policies and programs, by providing technical and financial assistance, as appropriate, and in accordance with national legislation to strengthen and build their capacity to participate more fully in the inter-American system.” Puerto España Declaration, 2009, ¶ 94, available at http://www.summit-americas.org/sisca/cs_sp.html.

[4] OAS. Increasing and Strengthening the Participation of civil society and Social Actors in the Activities of the Organization of American States. AG/RES. 2736 (XLII-O/12), adopted at the second plenary session, held on June 4, 2012.

[5] In that respect, according the calendar of IACHR sessions, that same day, hearings were held in relation to Canada, Haiti, Chile, Brasil, Panama, and El Salvador, as well as regional hearings on the situation of human rights of LGBTI persons in the Americas; citizen security and human rights in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras; the situation of human rights of afro-descendant women in Latin America; situation of the right to freedom of association in the Americas; and the situation of human rights defenders in Mesoamerica.  For more information on the 143rd period of IACHR sessions, see: http://www.cidh.oas.org/pdf%20files/Calendario143.pdf

Judges dismissed after Honduran coup d’état publicly request Inter-American Commission to issue final case report

The State still does not recognize breakdown in constitutional order

Washington, D. C., March 26, 2012- The four judges who were dismissed for expressing themselves and acting against the 2009 coup d’état,  requested today that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR)  issue its final case report. The request was made by the Association of Judges for Democracy in Honduras (AJD) and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) during a public hearing at the Commission’s 144º Sessions.

 

The judges Adan Guillermo Lopez Lone, Luis Chevez de la Rocha, Ramon Barrios and magistrate Tirza Flores Lanza denounced that the State has still not recognized or repaired the human rights violations that they suffered as a consequence of their arbitrary dismissal.

 

Mon, 03/26/2012

 

Washington, D. C., March 26, 2012- The four judges who were dismissed for expressing themselves and acting against the 2009 coup d’état,  requested today that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR)  issue its final case report. The request was made by the Association of Judges for Democracy in Honduras (AJD) and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) during a public hearing at the Commission’s 144º Sessions.

 

The judges Adan Guillermo Lopez Lone, Luis Chevez de la Rocha, Ramon Barrios and magistrate Tirza Flores Lanza denounced that the State has still not recognized or repaired the human rights violations that they suffered as a consequence of their arbitrary dismissal.

 

On May 5, 2010, the judges were dismissed by the Supreme Court of Justice for expressing themselves against the coup’ d’ état and, in the case of Judge Flores, for filing an extraordinary  petition against the expatriation of President José Manuel Zelaya Rosales.

 

The AJD and CEJIL reaffirmed their complaint for the violation of the right to judicial guarantees, freedom of expression, freedom of association, political rights and the right to judicial protection. In the case of Judge Chevez de la Rocha, the State is responsible for the violation of his right to personal freedom.  The State is also responsible for the violation of Judge Lopez Lone’s right to freedom of association.

 

During its intervention, the State provided no new information on the case and continued to deny that there had been a coup. Furthermore, it continued to maintain that the dismissal of the judges was due to their involvement in “political party” related activities.

 

In response to the State, Judge Lopez Lone denied that their actions were politically motivated. He emphasized that their actions were in support of democracy and the restoration of the constitutional order.

 

The Guillermo Lopez Lone at al Vs. Honduras case (“Dismissed judges”) is the first case about human rights violations related to the Honduran Coup d’état to be admitted by the Inter-American Commission. Given the multiple violations committed during and after the constitutional breakdown, the petitioner organizations stated that the recommendations to be issued by the IACHR can contribute to promoting structural reform to secure judicial independence in Honduras, as well as to furthering justice in other cases.

 

 

 

 

Contacto en Washington

Milli Legrain

+1-202- 319 3000, ext. 15 (fijo)

mlegrain@cejil.org

 

Contacto en Costa Rica:

Darío Chinchilla

+506 - 2281-3280

dchinchilla@cejil.org

 

 

Honduras before the Inter-American Commission again for the dismissal of judges following the coup d´état

Washington D.C and Tegucigalpa, March 20, 2012- On March 26, 2012 the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights (IACHR), as part of its 144th Sessions, will hold another public hearing related to the case of the Honduran judges who were dismissed by the Supreme Court, after the coup d´état of June 2009.

Tue, 03/20/2012

Jueces despedidos

Washington D.C and Tegucigalpa, March 20, 2012- On March 26, 2012 the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights (IACHR), as part of its 144th Sessions, will hold another public hearing related to the case of the Honduran judges who were dismissed by the Supreme Court, after the coup d´état of June 2009.

 

A year ago, at its 141th session, the IACHR held a public hearing, after which it decided to admit the petition filed against the State of Honduras for the dismissal of judges Guillermo Lopez, Luis Chevez, Ramon Barrios and Tirza Flores Lanza, which alleges several human rights violations, including the right to judicial guarantees, freedom of expression, freedom of assembly, freedom of association and the right to judicial protection.

 

This purpose of the upcoming hearing is to provide more information and argue the merits of the case so the IACHR can submit its final report stating the facts and conclusions of the case as well as the relevant recommendations as soon as possible.

 

The Honduran State has also been summoned to attend this hearing and will be held accountable before the IACHR.

 

The hearing will be held on March 26 at 9:30am (Central time zone) in the Rubén Darío hall in the GSB Building of the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington D.C (1889 F St NW).

 

 

The hearing will be broadcast via the following link:

http://www.oas.org/en/media_center/webcast.asp

 

 

For more information on CEJIL´s hearings click here

 

Contact in Washington D.C

Milli Legrain

+1-202- 319 3000

mlegrain@cejil.org

 

Contact in Costa Rica:

Darío Chinchilla

+506 - 2281-3280

dchinchilla@cejil.org

 

Honduras has failed in its obligation to protect human rights defender Gladys Lanza

Public hearing is held before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

San José and Washington D.C, February 24th, 2012- The State of Honduras has not implemented the protective measures that were ordered by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in favor of human rights defender Gladys Lanza Ochoa, on September 3rd, 2010. The defender herself made this statement before the Court at a public hearing monitoring the compliance with provisional protective measures, held during the 94th period of ordinary sessions. The Committee of Relatives of the Disappeared in Honduras (COFADEH) and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL), the victim´s representatives, also took part in the hearing.

Fri, 02/24/2012

San José, 23 de febrero de 2012. Marcia Aguiluz (CEJIL), Gladys Lanza (Movimiento de Mujeres por la Paz) y Bertha Oliva (COFADEH) esperan el inicio de una sesión ante la Corte IDH en la que se supervisará el cumplimiento de las medidas provisonales a favor de Lanza.

San José and Washington D.C, February 24th, 2012- The State of Honduras has not implemented the protective measures that were ordered by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in favor of human rights defender Gladys Lanza Ochoa, on September 3rd, 2010. The defender herself made this statement before the Court at a public hearing monitoring the compliance with provisional protective measures, held during the 94th period of ordinary sessions. The Committee of Relatives of the Disappeared in Honduras (COFADEH) and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL), the victim´s representatives, also took part in the hearing.

Gladys Lanza is the coordinator of the Visitacion Padilla Women´s Movement for Peace (Movimiento de Mujeres por la Paz Visitación Padilla), a Honduran organization with over 28 years´ experience in defending women’s rights. After the 2009 coup d’état in Honduras, her organization – along with many human rights defenders – condemned the perpetrators of the coup as well as the country´s military leadership. Since then, she has been subjected to threats and harassment, including intimidating phone calls and e-mails, she has also been followed and her actions monitored by unknown suspects at her home and workplace.

To date, the State has failed to diligently investigate these acts and those responsible remain unpunished. In addition, the protective measures have not been properly implemented by the State.  As a result, Ms Lanza told the Court how she has had to take extreme precautions to ensure her own safety.

Since April 2011, Gladys Lanza has been the object of five incidents that have kept her on alert. On one occasion a tear gas bomb landed in the courtyard of her home. On two separate occasions, her NGO´s offices have been under surveillance and broken in to.

This is not an isolated case. The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, Margaret Sekaggya, visited Honduras from February 7-14, 2012. After her visit she referred to the lack of protection facing human rights defenders, even though many of them are beneficiaries of protective measures, granted by the Inter-American Court or Commission of Human Rights.

“As a crucial measure to overcome the distrust of authorities among human rights defenders, an adequately resourced protection program for human rights defenders should be established and implemented as a matter of urgency and an inter-institutional framework developed to assume responsibility for its coordination and regular and transparent review”, the Rapporteur recommended.

At the end of her statement before the Court, Lanza said: “I want to get my life back, my safety but, overall, my family”. She concluded that the State must investigate the incidents that she has suffered and prosecute those responsible to ensure her full protection.

 

Contact in Costa Rica:

Darío Chinchilla

dchinchilla@cejil.org

+(506) 2281-3280

 

Contact in Washington D.C

Milli Legrain

mlegrain@cejil.org

+1-202-319-3000

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