Colombia

Forum with Civil Society Organizations - VI Summit of the Americas

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Wed, 04/11/2012 - 09:00 - Thu, 04/12/2012 - 17:00
VI Summit of the Americas
Cartagena

CEJIL condemns Colombia’s contempt for the precautionary measures granted by the IACHR in the case of Mayor Petro

The measures are an international obligation for Colombia

Washington DC, Thursday, March 20, 2014. The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) strongly condemns Colombia’s contempt for the precautionary measures granted by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) on Tuesday, March 18. The measures were granted to protect the political rights of the mayor of Bogota, Gustavo Petro Urrego.

Thu, 03/20/2014

Washington DC, Thursday, March 20, 2014. The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) strongly condemns Colombia’s contempt for the precautionary measures granted by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) on Tuesday, March 18. The measures were granted to protect the political rights of the mayor of Bogota, Gustavo Petro Urrego.

Not long after receiving the IACHR’s decision, the President of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos, announced his position to not comply with the measures and stated he would proceed to ratify the mayor’s dismissal.

Colombia’s contempt implies a serious breach of its international obligations as a signatory of the American Convention of Human Rights as well as other international treaties.

The IACHR has the competency to issue binding measures of protection under the mandate for protection and promotion of human rights in the region, granted by the OAS Charter and the American Convention. Moreover, this is explicitly outlined in the Inter-American Convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons, ratified by Colombia, as well as the Rules and Regulations of the Commission itself.

This power is also consistent with the authority held by other human rights organs to issue urgent protective measures to protect fundamental rights, including, for example, the International Court of Justice, the European Court for Human Rights, and the United Nations Committee Against Torture, among many others. These bodies have issued binding measures of protection, not only to protect life and integrity, but also other rights, like the right to family and property.

Thus, the Colombian Executive’s assertion that the precautionary measures are “requests” and only binding when protecting life and integrity is untenable in relation to international human rights law.

CEJIL notes that on numerous occasions the Colombian Constitutional Court itself has recognized that the measures are obligatory and that the State must comply. The Court specifically stated in the T-558-03 sentence that the measures assume, “a legal act adopted by an international organ for the protection of fundamental human rights, whereby the State is urged to adopt, in the shortest time possible, administrative or legal measures to cease a threat to a particular human right.” This position has served as jurisprudence of the Constitutional Court and been reiterated on various occasions.

Historically, the Colombian authorities have been willing to cooperate with the international organs for the effective application of these measures. Consequently, President Santos’s decision contradicts the country’s former position within the Inter-American Human Rights System.

In its resolution, the IACHR mentions the particular importance to preserve the political rights of public officials who are elected by popular vote due to their importance to the democratic system. In addition, it states that, in the face of any process resulting in the removal or disqualification of said officials, the parameters guaranteed by the American Convention must be respected.

In light of these events, CEJIL reminds the Sate of Colombia, as well as the powers that comprise it, of its international obligations. According to Viviana Krsticevic, CEJIL’s Executive Director, “the Colombian Executive decision generates a profound concern because it violates the application of international conventions on human rights, erodes the democratic system and minimizes the legitimacy of the Inter-American System.”

Resolution on Precautionary Measure in Spanish

Amicus Curiae Presented to the State Council by CEJIL (Spanish only)

Press Contact

Daniela Araya

+506 22807473

daraya@cejil.org

 

The dismissal of Mayor Gustavo Petro infringes on the political rights guaranteed in the American Convention on Human Rights

Disciplinary authority cannot undermine pluralism and democracy

On December 9, 2013, Mr. Gustavo Petro Urrego, Mayor of Bogota, the capital city of the Republic of Colombia, was dismissed from his position by the Office of the Attorney General of the Nation following an administrative (not judicial) decision. This decision also prohibits him from working for the next 15 years in public service, and is based on alleged irregularities which occurred following the changes to the management of garbage collection in the city in December 2012.

Wed, 12/11/2013

On December 9, 2013, Mr. Gustavo Petro Urrego, Mayor of Bogota, the capital city of the Republic of Colombia, was dismissed from his position by the Office of the Attorney General of the Nation following an administrative (not judicial) decision. This decision also prohibits him from working for the next 15 years in public service, and is based on alleged irregularities which occurred following the changes to the management of garbage collection in the city in December 2012.

Depriving Mr. Petro of the exercise of his political rights does not comply with the minimum legal requirement for the legitimate restriction of rights, as provided in Article 23 of the American Convention on Human Rights, and by the jurisprudence of the protection organs of the Inter-American System. Said decision also impacts, in a direct manner, the political rights of thousands of citizens who elected Petro as Mayor.

The Inter-American Commission and Court of Human Rights have interpreted the scope of political rights recognized in the American Convention. State actors charged with the protection of fundamental rights – among them administrative and judicial personnel – are bound to the jurisprudence of the Court by the Control of Conventionality doctrine. In the pioneering judgment issued on the case Yatama v. Nicaragua, the Court upheld the importance of the right to vote and to be elected, to access to judicial review to guarantee political rights, as well as the relevance of simple, rapid and timely action on the part of the judiciary to resolve electoral matters. Additionally, the Tribunal reiterated the importance of public and plural debate in the judgment issued on the case Cepeda v. Colombia.

Furthermore, in the case López Mendoza v. Venezuela, the Court interpreted the right to political participation established in article 23 of the American Convention, which guarantees all citizens the right “to take part in the conduct of public affairs, directly or through freely chosen representatives”. In the decision on the case, the Court upheld that “article 23.2 of the Convention determines the motives which can permit the restriction of the rights recognized in article 23.1 [which consecrates political rights]”. The Tribunal concluded that “a restriction imposed as a result of criminal charge” should be the result of “sentencing by a competent court in criminal proceedings”. This judgment narrows the possibility of limiting the exercise of political rights of an elected official to the sentencing by a judge in a criminal proceeding.

In light of these Inter-American Court decisions the dismissal of the Mayor Petro by the Office of the Attorney General is arbitrary as it restricts his rights without the existence of a criminal charge against him. Furthermore, it infringes on the rights of important sectors of the electorate whose political rights are curtailed with the removal of the Mayor chosen by them in popular election.

As such, the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) urges the Colombian State, and in particular its judicial and administrative authorities, to take all necessary measures to rectify in an effective and timely manner the adopted decision in order to fully guarantee political rights in Colombia.

Additional Information

In article 23 of the American Convention on Human Rights, political rights are recognized in the following terms:

1. Every citizen shall enjoy the following rights and opportunities:

a. to take part in the conduct of public affairs, directly or through freely chosen representatives;

b. to vote and to be elected in genuine periodic elections, which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and by secret ballot that guarantees the free expression of the will of the voters; and

c. to have access, under general conditions of equality, to the public service of his country.

Similarly, article 23 upholds that: “the law may regulate the exercise of the rights and opportunities referred to in the preceding paragraph only on the basis of age, nationality, residence, language, education, civil and mental capacity, or sentencing by a competent court in criminal proceedings.”

 

Victims of the counter-siege of Colombia’s Palace of Justice appear before the IA Court

The subject of the hearing will be the violations committed against the 12 forcibly disappeared, 4 tortured, and the victim of extrajudicial execution

Brasilia, Monday November 11, 2013 – This Tuesday, in a public hearing before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IA Court), the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL), el Colectivo de Abogados José Alvéar Restrepo (CCAJAR), the Comisión Intereclesial de Justicia y Paz, and the attorneys Jorge Molano and Germán Romero, will defend the victims of grave human rights violations perpetrated by the Colombian Armed Forces during the operation to recapture the Palace of Justice.

Tue, 11/12/2013

Audiencia ante la Corte IDH iniciará este martes 12 de noviembre

Brasilia, Monday November 11, 2013 – This Tuesday, in a public hearing before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IA Court), the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL), el Colectivo de Abogados José Alvéar Restrepo (CCAJAR), the Comisión Intereclesial de Justicia y Paz, and the attorneys Jorge Molano and Germán Romero, will defend the victims of grave human rights violations perpetrated by the Colombian Armed Forces during the operation to recapture the Palace of Justice.

The hearing will take place on Tuesday, November 12 and Wednesday, November 13 in the Superior Labor Court in Brasilia, Brazil, with live transmission via the link http://www.corteidh.or.cr/

The aforementioned organizations will represent the families of Carlos Augusto Rodríguez Vera, Cristina del Pilar Guarín Cortés, David Suspes Celis, Luz Mary Portela León, Bernardo Beltrán Hernández, Héctor Jaime Beltrán Fuentes, Gloria Estela Lizarazo, Ana Rosa Castiblanco, Gloria Anzola de Lanao, Lucy Amparo Oviedo, Norma Constanza Esguerra, and that of the M19 Guerrilla Irma Franco Pineda. Equally, they will represent the four victims of arbitrary detention and torture; Yolanda Santodomingo Albericci, Eduardo Matson Ospino, Orlando Quijano and José Vicente Rubiano Galvis. Finally, they will address the forced disappearance and subsequent extrajudicial execution of the Auxiliary Magistrate to the Council of the State, Carlos Horacio Urán.

During the hearing a victim of torture, the brother of one of the disappeared, and the wife of an executed magistrate will give testimony. Additionally, evidence will be presented before the Court by a diverse group of international experts.

The present case relates to the events which occurred on November 6 and 7, 1985, during the siege of the Palace of Justice in Bogota, Colombia, by the guerilla group M-19 and the subsequent counter-siege carried out by the Army. These events led to the forced disappearance of 12 people, four of whom were tortured, and the disappearance and subsequent extrajudicial execution of a magistrate by the Armed Forces.

Following 28 years of waiting, the case was elevated to the highest instance of human rights protection on the continent. The objective of its presentation before the IA Court is to identify the whereabouts of the disappeared, and similarly establish the responsibility of the Colombian State for these human rights violations. The State will carry out a partial recognition of responsibility, which will be responded to during the hearing by the victims and their families.

In the course of the following year, the Court will issue a sentence on the case.

 

For more information:


Daniela Araya                                                                        Ana Paula Barreto Da Silva

Communications Office                                                              Contact in Brasil

(506) 2280-7473 / 506 8820-8588                                             (61) 8120-0839

daraya@cejil.org imprensacejil@cejil.org

 

The Rochela Massacre / Colombia

Homenaje a víctimas de la masacre de La Rochela

In the community of La Rochela, in January 1989, a paramilitary group kidnapped a 15-person commission of judicial officials who were investigating the civic and military responsibilities involved in various massacres committed in the Magdalena Medio zone. The paramilitaries shot at the group, killing 12 and injuring the other three.

CEJIL and the Collective of Attorneys José Alvear Restrepo brought the case before the Inter-American Human Rights Commission (CIDH) and later represented the victims and their families before the Inter-American Human Rights Court.

In May 2007, the Inter-American Court made its decision on the case, in which it considered Colombia responsible for the violation of the human rights to life, personal integrity, liberty, and the judicial guarantees of the 15 victims and their families. It also ordered the Colombian government to investigate the massacre in a diligent manner, including the possibility that high government officials knew, or should have known, about the paramilitaries’ actions. The court established that, between 1979 and 1991, there was an average of approximately 25 judges and lawyers that were assassinated or suffered assassination attempts annually.

The court analyzed the legal setting regarding the demobilization of illegal armed groups, leaving it clear that the lax processes that generate an inappropriate decrease in the penalties makes the government responsible.

The plaintiffs are currently continuing to work towards the completion of the whole sentence that was dictated by the Inter-American Court.

47th Extraordinary Session of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

Mon, 03/18/2013 (All day) - Fri, 03/22/2013 (All day)
Medellin
Colombia

IACHR visit to Colombia

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) will carry out an in loco visit to Colombia from December 3 - 7 2012, following an invitation by the Colombian government.

This will be the first IACHR in loco visit to Colombia since 2004.


IACHR press release here.

 

Fri, 11/30/2012

 

 

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) will carry out an in loco visit to Colombia between the December 3 and 7, 2012, following an invitation by the Colombian government.

 

This will be the first IACHR in loco visit to Colombia since 2004.


IACHR press release here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Venezuela´s withdrawal from the Inter-American Court would undermine the protection of human rights in the country

Statement by International Coalition of Organizations for Human Rights in the Americas

The undersigned organizations, members of the International Coalition of Organizations for Human Rights in the Americas express their profound concern regarding the recent declarations of Hugo Chávez Frías and Nicolás Maduro, President and Foreign Affairs Secretary of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, respectively. The declarations relate to the definitive withdrawal of the Venezuelan State from the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.

 

Tue, 07/31/2012

July 31, 2012

The undersigned organizations, members of the International Coalition of Organizations for Human Rights in the Americas express their profound concern regarding the recent declarations of Hugo Chávez Frías and Nicolás Maduro, President and Foreign Affairs Secretary of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, respectively. The declarations relate to the definitive withdrawal of the Venezuelan State from the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.

A measure of this kind would have serious repercussions for the protection of the human rights of Venezuelan citizens, who would not have recourse to justice provided by the Inter-American System’s protection bodies, in instances in which their rights were not effectively protected in their own country.

Both the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the Inter-American Commission are autonomous and independent bodies that, while exercising their functions, have contributed to the establishment of standards which protect human rights in our region. These organizations have played a fundamental role in the protection of the rights of thousands of victims and citizens on our continent.

Since their creation, the Inter-American Court and Commission have analyzed cases of grave human rights violations and have contributed significantly to the consolidation of democratic institutions, the adoption of legislation which promotes equality and guarantees the protection of human rights, as well as to the struggle against impunity. These bodies have focused particularly on the protection of people or groups in vulnerable situations, the struggle for the eradication of both gender-based violence and discrimination due to sexual orientation, the protection of the rights of indigenous peoples, and the prohibition of both torture as well as the practice of forced disappearance. Moreover, these two bodies have made a considerable contribution to the promotion, development and enhanced protection of economic, social and cultural rights.

The undersigned organizations consider that the Inter-American System fulfills an essential role in our region. Consequently, the potential withdrawal of Venezuela would severely undermine the protection of human rights in this country, and would eliminate the last recourse to justice available to those who have suffered human rights abuses. Venezuela´s announced departure from the Inter-American Court is preceded by its failure to comply with sentences and protection measures ordered by said tribunal. The undersigned organizations urge the Venezuelan government to ratify their commitment to the protection of human rights through the effective compliance with the decisions issued by the Inter-American Court, and to reconsider their claims of withdrawal from the Inter-American System.

Finally, we would like to address the member States of the Organization of American States (OAS) to reiterate our concerns regarding the risk that the withdrawal of Venezuela from one of the bodies of the Inter-American System would represent for the region, Venezuelan citizens, and above all its victims of human rights violations. As such, we call on the members states of the OAS to reaffirm their commitment to the universality of the Inter-American System by taking all necessary actions to ensure that the Venezuelan State reconsiders its decision to remove itself from the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.

Signatories:

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Amnesty International (AI)

Federación Internacional de Derechos Humanos (FIDH)

Peace Brigades International (PBI)

 

REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS:

Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL)

Plataforma Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, Democracia y Desarrollo (PIDHDD)

Lawyers Without Borders- Canada

 

BY COUNTRY

Argentina:

Asociación por los Derechos Civiles (ADC)

Equipo Latinoamericano de Justicia y Género (ELA)

 

Bolivia:

Oficina Jurídica Para la Mujer

Comité de América Latina y el Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer  (CLADEM )

 

Brazil:

Conectas Direitos Humanos

 

Chile:

Corporación Humanas - Chile

 

Colombia:

Comisión Colombiana de Juristas (CCJ)

Consultoría para los Derechos Humanos y el Desplazamiento (CODHES)

Corporación Colectivo de Abogados José Alvear Restrepo (CCAJAR)

Corporación para la Defensa y Promoción de los Derechos Humanos – Reiniciar

Grupo Interdisciplinario por los Derechos Humanos (GIDH)

 

Costa Rica:

Defensa de Niñas y Niños – Internacional, DNI Costa Rica

 

Ecuador:

Centro de Documentación en Derechos Humanos “Segundo Montes Mozo .J.” (CSMM)

Comisión Ecuménica de Derechos Humanos (CEDHU)

 

United States:

Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA)

 

Guatemala:

Asociación Seguridad en Democracia (SEDEM)

Fundación para la Justicia y la Defensa de los Derechos Humanos (FUNJUDEH)

Oficina de Derechos Humanos del Arzobispado de Guatemala (ODHAG)

Unidad de Protección a Defensoras y Defensores de Derechos Humanos (UDEFEGUA)

 

Mexico:

Centro de Derechos Humanos Miguel Agustín Pro Juárez (Prodh)

Grupo de Mujeres de San Cristóbal Las Casas, A.C. (COLEM)

 

Nicaragua:

Centro Nicaragüense de Derechos Humanos (CENIDH)

 

Paraguay

Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos del Paraguay (CODEHUPY)

 

Peru:

Asociación Nacional de Centros (ANC)

Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH)

CEDAL - Centro de Derechos y Desarrollo

Centro de Políticas Públicas y Derechos Humanos - Perú EQUIDAD

Coordinadora Nacional de Derechos Humanos (CNDDHH)

Fundación Ecuménica para el Desarrollo y la Paz (FEDEPAZ)

 

Uruguay:

Instituto de Estudios Legales y Sociales del Uruguay (IELSUR)

 

Venezuela:

Acción Solidaria en VIH/Sida

Civilis Derechos Humanos

Comisión de Justicia y Paz de la Conferencia Episcopal de Venezuela

Comité de Familiares de Víctimas de los Sucesos de Febrero-Marzo de 1989 (COFAVIC)

Espacio Público

Justicia y Pas Los Teques

Observatorio Venezonalano de Prisiones (OVP)

Oficina de Derechos Humanos de la Diócesis de Los Teques

Programa Venezolano de Educación – Acción en Derechos Humanos (Provea)

Sinergia, Asociación Venezolana de Organizaciones de Sociedad Civil

Transparencia – Venezuela

Una Ventana a la Libertad

Vicaría de Derechos Humanos de Caracas

 

 

Civil Society Letter to President of the Permanent Council

Transparency in the OAS

Distinguished Ambassador Pary Rodríguez:

 

The signatory organizations address your office in order to express our concern about the lack of Civil Society participation in the above-mentioned process, an issue that we consider of great importance.

As already known to you, during the OAS General Assembly, which took place this past June in Cochabamba, Bolivia, the regional States approved Resolution AG/RES.2761 in which they welcomed the report of the Special Working Group to Reflect on the Workings of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights with a View to Strengthening the Inter-American Human Rights System.  Additionally, the Resolution instructed the Permanent Council, on the basis of the report, “to draw up proposals for its application in dialogue with all the parties involved,”[1] further providing that said proposals should be presented for consideration before a Special Session of the General Assembly no later than the first quarter of 2013.

 


Wed, 06/20/2012

Distinguished Ambassador Pary Rodríguez:

 

The signatory organizations address your office in order to express our concern about the lack of Civil Society participation in the above-mentioned process, an issue that we consider of great importance.

As already known to you, during the OAS General Assembly, which took place this past June in Cochabamba, Bolivia, the regional States approved Resolution AG/RES.2761 in which they welcomed the report of the Special Working Group to Reflect on the Workings of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights with a View to Strengthening the Inter-American Human Rights System.  Additionally, the Resolution instructed the Permanent Council, on the basis of the report, “to draw up proposals for its application in dialogue with all the parties involved,”[1] further providing that said proposals should be presented for consideration before a Special Session of the General Assembly no later than the first quarter of 2013.

In accordance with this mandate, the Permanent Council included this issue in its regular meeting this past June 28th, establishing the formal initiation of the process.  Several days later, the OAS Secretariat for External Relations, through its Department of International Affairs, publicly announced this decision, informing Civil Society that the “Permanent Council will hold informal meetings to define its methodology, work plan, agenda and the manner of consultation.”[2]

In this regard, the signatory organizations consider that the manner in which Civil Society participation has been incorporated into the discussions ordered by the General Assembly in its Resolution does not constitute a process of real and effective participation consistent with the principles the OAS has established on the issue.

The OAS has recognized on numerous occasions the importance of the participation of Civil Society organizations.  In fact, the Inter-American Democratic Charter reaffirms the principle that the promotion of Civil Society participation in OAS activities strengthens democratic institutions in the region; similarly and on the occasion of the 5th Summit of the Americas, held in Puerto España, the regional heads of State expressed their commitment to stimulating full participation of Civil Society in the Inter-American System (¶ 94).[3]

More recently, during the last General Assembly, the States of the region adopted Resolution AG/RES. 2736 (XLII-O/12),[4] in which they committed to broadening and guaranteeing dialogue with and participation of civil society through various means.

In light of the above and given the importance of the issue being discussed by the Permanent Council, namely the strengthening of the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights, the signatory organizations consider that the resulting process to be adopted must ensure adequate means, opportunities and forums so that the participation of Civil Society may be real and effective and guarantee a true dialogue amongst all parties involved.

In this sense, we respectfully appeal for the re-adoption of the standards fixed by the General Assembly with respect to Civil Society participation and that, at minimum, the following be guaranteed:

  • Transparent discussions at the regional level (within the Permanent Council or other instance at the OAS), as well as within the States;
  • Consultative procedures are implemented in the States, extending beyond country capitals particularly in larger countries where it may be more difficult for Civil Society to respond to invitations in the capital;
  • Recognition of the value of using resources from the Specific Fund to finance the participation of Civil Society organizations and other social actors in discussions about the issue of strengthening the Inter-American Commission  To contemplate and implement innovative methods, other than in-person interventions during the Permanent Council sessions that go beyond the formal circulation of documents.  Tools such as real-time long distance participation and live webcast transmissions of all discussions should be guaranteed as a minimum to enable informed contributions with respect to the various issues that are discussed
  • Ensure a dynamic that facilitates dialogue during meetings and in each of the debates established by the Permanent Council that would not only be by formal written participation.  It is clear that participation cannot be reduced to occasional moments, but rather must be ensured throughout the process, something which was not previously guaranteed in the procedures prior to the discussion of the Working Group report.  Given that the very same day the IACHR was still conducting hearings, numerous organizations and civil servants from various countries were unable to participate in the so-called dialogue[5]

Based on the aforementioned, we consider it critical that, as a minimum and prior to any substantive discussion on the issue, during the upcoming session of the Permanent Council, a methodology can be worked out that establishes means for disseminating information, a delineation of the various actors involved in the discussion on strengthening the Inter-American Commission, an identification of forums for real participation, as well as a calendar of meeting and events that will be held in Washington, as well as within the States during the coming months.

We wish to insist on the need to generate opportunities for effective participation on each of the discussion points and in each of the meetings held on this issue concerning the continuity of the Inter-American System for the protection of human rights.

The signatory organizations respectfully request that we be heard by the States and that our opinions and contributions be taken into account, not only when the recommendations of the Working Group report are discussed, but also when methodological and scheduling issues need to be resolved.

We thank you in advance for your attention and look forward to your response.

 

cc. José Miguel Insulza. Secretary General of the OAS.

cc. José de Jesús Orozco, President, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

 

Signatory Organizations

Regional

Amazon Watch

Amnistía Internacional

Asociación Interamericana para la Defensa del Ambiente (AIDA)

Campaña por una Convención Interamericana por los Derechos Sexuales y los Derechos Reproductivos

Centro por la Justicia y el Derecho Internacional (CEJIL)

Coalición LGBTTTI Trabajando en la OEA

Comité de América Latina y el Caribe por la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer (CLADEM)

Confluencia Feminista Mesoamericana Las Petateras

International Pregnancy Advisory Services (Servicios Internacionales de Asesoría sobre el Embarazo) IPAS – Centroamérica

Plataforma Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, Democracia y Desarrollo (PIDHDD)

Red latinoamericana y caribeña por la defensa de los derechos de los niños, niñas y adolescentes (Redlamyc)

Servicio Paz y Justicia en América Latina (SERPAJ – AL)

 

Bolivia

Oficina Jurídica Para la Mujer

 

Brasil

Grupo Tortura Nunca Mais - Rio de Janeiro

ISER- Instituto de Estudos da Religião

Chile

Corporación Humanas

 

Colombia

Colectivo de Abogados José Alvear Restrepo (CCAJAR)

Comisión Colombiana de Juristas (CCJ)

Corporación para la Defensa y Promoción de los Derechos Humanos REINICIAR

Grupo Interdisciplinario por los Derechos Humanos (GIDH)

Peace Brigades International - Colombia Project

 

Costa Rica

Alianza por tus Derechos

 

Ecuador

Acción Ecológica

Centro de Documentación en Derechos Humanos “Segundo Montes Mozo S. J.” (CSMM)

Comisión Ecuménica de Derechos Humanos (CEDHU)

Fundación Pachamama

 

El Salvador

Asociación Pro-Búsqueda de Niños y Niñas Desaparecidos (PROBUSQUEDA)

Comité de Familiares de Migrantes Fallecidos y Desaparecidos de El Salvador (COFAMIDE)

Fundación de Estudios para la Aplicación del Derecho (FESPAD)

Instituto de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad Centroamericana “José Simeón Cañas” (IDHUCA)

Instituto de Estudios de la Mujer "Norma Virginia Guirola de Herrera" (CEMUJER)

Organización de Mujeres Salvadoreñas (ORMUSA)

 

Estados Unidos

Human Rights Clinic, University of Texas

US Office on Colombia

Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA)

Guatemala

Fundación Myrna Mack, Guatemala

Instituto de Estudios Comparados en Ciencias Penales de Guatemala (ICCPG)

Movimiento Social por los Derechos de la Niñez, Adolescencia y Juventud en Guatemala (90 organizaciones)

Unidad de Protección a Defensoras y Defensores de Derechos Humanos

 

Honduras

Asociación Cooperación Técnica Nacional (CTN)

Asociación de Jueces por la Democracia (AJD)

Asociación LGTB Arco Iris

Asociación para una vida mejor de personas infectadas/afectadas por el VIH-Sida en Honduras (APUVIMEH)

Casa Alianza

Centro de Investigación para la Prevención de la Violencia

Centro de Investigación y Promoción de Derechos Humanos en Honduras (CIPRODEH)

Centro para la prevención, tratamiento y rehabilitación de las víctimas de tortura y sus familiares (CPTRT)

Coalición Nacional de Mujeres de Honduras (CONAMUH)

Colectiva de Mujeres Hondureñas (CODEMUH)

Comité de Derechos Humanos de Honduras (CODEH)

Comité por la Libre Expresión  (C-LIBRE), Honduras

Convergencia por los Derechos Humanos de la Zona Nor Occidental

Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación de la Compañía de Jesús (ERIC)

Foro de Mujeres por la Vida

Foro Nacional para las Migraciones de Honduras (FONAMIH)

Gran Alianza por OMOA

Movimiento de Mujeres por la Paz Visitación Padilla

Organización Fraternal Negra de Honduras (OFRANEH)

Tribuna de Mujeres contra los Femicidios

 

México

Abogadas y Abogados para la Justicia y los Derechos Humanos, A. C.

Acción Urgente para Defensores de los Derechos Humanos, A.C. (ACCUDEH)

Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña “Tlachinollan”, A.C. (Tlachinollan)

Centro de Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres, A. C.  (CEDHEM)

Centro de Derechos Humanos Fray Bartolomé de las Casas A.C.

Centro de Derechos Humanos Miguel Agustín Pro Juárez, A.C. (Prodh)

Centro Mexicano de Derecho Ambiental, A.C. (CEMDA)

Ciudadanos en Apoyo a los Derechos Humanos, A.C. (CADHAC)

Comisión de Solidaridad y Defensa de los Derechos Humanos, A.C. (COSYDDHAC)

Comité de Defensa Integral de Derechos Humanos Gobixha (Código DH)

Fundación para la Justicia y el Estado Democrático de Derecho

Grupo de Mujeres de San Cristóbal de las Casas, A.C.

i(dh)eas, Litigio Estratégico en Derechos Humanos, A.C. (IDHEAS)

Red Nacional de Organismos Civiles de Derechos Humanos "Todos los Derechos para Todas y Todos" integrada por 71 organizaciones en 21 estados de la República mexicana.

Servicios Legales e Investigación y Estudios Jurídicos (SLIEJ)

 

Nicaragua

Casa Alianza

Centro de Asistencia Legal a Pueblos Indígenas (CALPI)

Centro de Información y Servicios de Asesoría en Salud (SISAS)

Centro de Investigaciones de la Comunicación (CINCO)

Centro Nicaragüense de Derechos Humanos (CENIDH)

Comisión Permanente de Derechos Humanos (CPDH)

FIBRAS/Movimiento por Nicaragua

Movimiento Autónomo de Mujeres

Movimiento contra el abuso sexual

Movimiento Feminista de Nicaragua

Oficina de asistencia técnica para el desarrollo y la equidad (CIFEM), Nicaragua

Red de Mujeres contra la Violencia

Panamá

Alianza Ciudadana Pro Justicia, Panamá

Centro de Asistencia Legal Popular (CEALP)

Centro de Incidencia Ambiental (CIAM)

Centro de Iniciativas Democráticas (CIDEM)

Instituto de Derecho Agrario, Ambiental e Indígena

 

Paraguay

BASE Investigaciones Sociales,

Servicio Paz y Justicia (SERPAJ)

Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos del Paraguay (CODEHUPY)

 

Perú

Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (Aprodeh)

CEDAL-Centro de Derechos y Desarrollo

Coordinadora Nacional de Derechos Humanos

 

Uruguay

Instituto de Estudios Legales y Sociales del Uruguay (IELSUR)

 

Venezuela

Acción Solidaria en VIH/Sida

Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad Católica Andrés Bello

Civilis Derechos Humanos

Comité de Familiares de las Víctimas de los sucesos ocurridos entre el 27 de febrero y los primeros días de marzo de 1989 (COFAVIC)

Espacio Público

Programa Venezolano de Educación – Acción en Derechos Humanos (Provea)

Sinergia, Asociación Venezolana de Organizaciones de Sociedad Civil

Vicaría de Derechos Humanos de Caracas

 


[1] AG/RES. 2761 (XLII-O/12), Follow-up on the Recommendations Contained in the “Report of the Special Working Group to Reflect on the Workings of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights with a View to strengthening the Inter-American Human Rights System,” adopted at the fourth plenary session of the General Assembly in Bolivia, held on June 5, 2012.  Paragraph two establishes, “To instruct the Permanent Council, on the basis of the report, to draw up proposals for its application in dialogue with all the parties involved.”

[2] Email dated July 5, 2012 disseminated through the list osc_registradas@lists.oas.org by the Directorship of the Department of International Affairs, of the OAS Secretariat for External Relations, titled, “OEA - Consulta - Recomendaciones sobre el Funcionamiento de la CIDH y el Fortalecimiento del SIDH | OAS - Consultation - Recommendations on the Functioning of the IACHR and the Strengthening of the IASHR”.

[3] “We commit to continue encouraging the participation of our peoples, through the engagement of our citizens, communities and civil society in the design and execution of development policies and programs, by providing technical and financial assistance, as appropriate, and in accordance with national legislation to strengthen and build their capacity to participate more fully in the inter-American system.” Puerto España Declaration, 2009, ¶ 94, available at http://www.summit-americas.org/sisca/cs_sp.html.

[4] OAS. Increasing and Strengthening the Participation of civil society and Social Actors in the Activities of the Organization of American States. AG/RES. 2736 (XLII-O/12), adopted at the second plenary session, held on June 4, 2012.

[5] In that respect, according the calendar of IACHR sessions, that same day, hearings were held in relation to Canada, Haiti, Chile, Brasil, Panama, and El Salvador, as well as regional hearings on the situation of human rights of LGBTI persons in the Americas; citizen security and human rights in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras; the situation of human rights of afro-descendant women in Latin America; situation of the right to freedom of association in the Americas; and the situation of human rights defenders in Mesoamerica.  For more information on the 143rd period of IACHR sessions, see: http://www.cidh.oas.org/pdf%20files/Calendario143.pdf

VI Summit of the Americas

Sat, 04/14/2012 (All day) - Sun, 04/15/2012 (All day)
Cartagena
Colombia
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