Empowering human rights defenders

Summaries of Jurisprudence: Gender-based Violence. 2nd Edition Updated

CEJIL presents a new title to its collection of Summaries of Jurisprudence, this time dedicated to Gender Violence.

This publication includes a selection of texts of decisions from international human rights organs related to the protection of women victims of violence. The compilation provides a solid body of jurisprudence that allows one to obtain a broad panorama of the reality of women in a variety of contexts, revealing the indisputable relevance of gender violence in the world, even further than the advances in regulation material.

We hope that this will be a useful tool that contributes to the defense of human rights and the eradication of one of the most tolerated and silenced human rights violations as such is the violence exercised against women.


Type of publication:Compilation of jurisprudence
Full version available in:
Year: 2011
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Summaries of Jurisprudence: Health and Reproductive Rights

CEJIL is delighted to present a new book to its collection of Tools for the Protection of Human Rights: Summaries of Jurisprudence, this time dedicated to Health and Reproductive Rights.

The human rights protection bodies recognize the access to medical care, including reproductive health, as a basic right. Nonetheless, the decisions included in this volume illustrate some of the grave deficiencies in the effective enjoyment of these rights, directly affecting women’s right to choose regarding maternity, accessing health information, or to be respected in their autonomy and privacy, among others.

These pages compile decisions and judgments that constitute more relevant jurisprudence in relation to health and reproductive rights. We hope that this book will be a useful tool that contributes to the defense of those rights.


Type of publication:Compilation of jurisprudence
Full version available in:
Year: 2012
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International Day Against Homophobia & Transphobia

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Human rights in the Inter-American System. Compilation of instruments. 2011 Edition.


Type of publication:Compilation of law
Full version available in:
Year: 2011
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Human rights in the Inter-American system. Compilation of instruments. 2009 edition.

Los Derechos Humanos en el Sistema Interamericano. Compilación de Instrumentos.

El Centro por la Justicia y el Derecho Internacional (CEJIL) se complace en presentar la sexta edición actualizada de su publicación Derechos Humanos en el Sistema Interamericano: Compilación de Instrumentos.

Desde la primera versión de este compendio de normativa interamericana sobre protección y defensa de los derechos humanos –editada en 1997- CEJIL se ha propuesto con esta compilación tornar más accesible a distintos públicos el conocimiento del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos desarrollado en el continente americano, así como el uso de las herramientas que el sistema interamericano (SI) pone a disposición de víctimas y defensores de derechos humanos.

La obra recopila las Declaraciones, Tratados, Protocolos y Principios que conforman la normativa fundamental del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos en el ámbito interamericano, complementándola con aquellos textos que reglamentan la composición y funcionamiento de la Comisión y Corte Interamericana (Estatutos y Reglamentos).

Esta sexta edición actualizada incluye las últimas modificaciones a los Reglamentos de la Comisión y la Corte introducidas en 2009, que afectan a aspectos centrales del Sistema como son las reglas aplicables a la fase de admisibilidad de peticiones, las medidas cautelares de protección, el papel de las víctimas en el litigio ante la Corte Interamericana, o cuestiones de representación legal, entre otras.

Adicionalmente, en esta nueva edición presentamos un cuadro que cumple con la intención de ofrecer de forma ilustrativa un panorama completo acerca del estado de ratificaciones de los instrumentos del sistema interamericano de derechos humanos. A su vez, la forma en que se expone la información permite tener una mirada abarcadora e integral acerca del grado de involucramiento de los Estados miembros de la OEA en el SI.


Type of publication:Compilation of law
Full version available in:
Year: 2009
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20 years since the historic adoption of the Inter-American Convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the historic adoption of the Inter-American Convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons, adopted in the 24th Ordinary Period of Sessions of the General Assembly of the OAS that took place in Belem do Para, Brazil in June 1994.

Organizations and human rights defenders in the regions make their position public on the pending obligations of the States to eradicate and punish the disappearance of persons, while recognizing the fundamental roles the Commission and Court of Human Rights have played in interpreting the scope of the rights they protect.

A the same time, the organizations and defenders alike make a strong call to the universalization of the Convention, which at this date has only been ratified by 15 countries. See the complete text of the Statement with its signatures here.

Mon, 06/09/2014

Foto Ilustrativa Desparición ForzadaToday marks the 20th anniversary of the historic adoption of the Inter-American Convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons, adopted in the 24th Ordinary Period of Sessions of the General Assembly of the OAS that took place in Belem do Para, Brazil in June 1994.

Organizations and human rights defenders in the regions make their position public on the pending obligations of the States to eradicate and punish the disappearance of persons, while recognizing the fundamental roles the Commission and Court of Human Rights have played in interpreting the scope of the rights they protect.

A the same time, the organizations and defenders alike make a strong call to the universalization of the Convention, which at this date has only been ratified by 15 countries. See the complete text of the Statement with its signatures here.

20 years after the Convention of Belem do Para: commitments must be strengthened so women can live without violence

Asuncion, Wednesday, June 4, 2014. The signing organizations, in the framework of the Forty-fourth Period of Ordinary Sessions of the General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS), celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the adoption of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence Against Women (Convention of “Belem do Para”), which to this date has been ratified by 32 of the 34 members of the OAS. The organizations especially note that this Inter-American human rights treaty has the highest number of ratifications, showing a political commitment to the elimination of all types of violence against women.

Fri, 06/06/2014

Fotografía Belém do ParáAsuncion, Wednesday, June 4, 2014. The signing organizations, in the framework of the Forty-fourth Period of Ordinary Sessions of the General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS), celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the adoption of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence Against Women (Convention of “Belem do Para”), which to this date has been ratified by 32 of the 34 members of the OAS. The organizations especially note that this Inter-American human rights treaty has the highest number of ratifications, showing a political commitment to the elimination of all types of violence against women.

The signing organizations appreciate that when the Convention of Belem do Para came into force, the majority of States pushed forward national legislative processes that led to the creation of laws aimed at fighting domestic violence. Nonetheless, the organizations stress that these advances have been insufficient at the level of prevention, investigation and the punishment of the violence against women. In addition, the complexity and impact that this type of violence represents has been hindered from being comprehensively addressed.

It is necessary to restate that the obligations established by the Convention of Belem do Para require the States to design and implement comprehensive public policies that take into account the different spaces where violence against women occurs, such as the situation of violence as well as the obstacles that women human rights defenders face to carry out their work.

At the same time, the signing organizations are troubled by the persistence of generalized impunity in relation to the investigation, prosecution, and punishment that state and non-state actors face for committing violent crimes against women.

On the other hand, in the framework of the current plenary sessions of the General Assembly of the OAS, which are centered on the issue of “Development with Social Inclusion,” it is essential to note that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has already recognized that there is a close link between the elimination of poverty and the protection and exercise of all women’s rights.

In turn, the signing organizations consider that putting into practice what is established in article 9 of the Convention is urgent and cannot be delayed, in the sense of especially protecting women that find themselves in situations worsened by vulnerability including children, the elderly, indigenous women, and women affected by poverty, violence and armed conflict. This will contribute to an adequate approach to guarantee women’s right to a life of dignity, free of violence.

The “factual and legal” inequality that affects women, as well as violence against women, continues to be expressions of the historically unequal power relations between women and men that structure our societies. This perspective, derived from the mandate of the Convention, should help address the analysis of the difficulties that still persist, and the proposals to overcome them.

20 years after the signing of the Convention of Belem do Para, the signing organizations urge the American States to firmly establish public policies and other effective actions in order to:

  • Fight against the persistence of gender stereotypes based on concepts of inferiority or subordination between men and women, as well as practices that promote the exploitation of women’s bodies, which perpetuate the historical discrimination that underlines violent acts against women;
  • Comprehensively address the diverse manifestations of violence that confront women in the Americas (lack of access to reproductive health, maternal mortality, lack of access to sexual education, discrimination, sexual violence, domestic violence, criminalization of abortion and attacks against human rights defenders, among others);
  • Broadly discuss, adopt and implement laws, legal procedures and public policies taking into account the diversity of women that live in the region and considering the complexity of the problem;
  • Guarantee the compilation of adequate and disaggregated statistics that allow the evaluation of the effectiveness of the measures of prevention, punishment and eradication of violence against women;
  • Incorporate a gender and ethnic perspective in the administration of justice;
  • Adequately comply with the decisions of the Inter-American System’s bodies, particularly in cases relating to discrimination and violence against women;
  • Comply with the duty to exercise due diligence to prevent violence against women, including domestic violence; in this sense the States should investigate, prosecute and punish the perpetrators (public officials or private individuals), and provide complete reparation to the women who are victims of the violence; and
  • Incorporate transversal gender indicators in public programs and proposals to measure the advancement of women’s human rights.

On the twentieth anniversary of the Convention of Belem do Para, the organizations remember that violence against women is a human rights violation and call for the full enjoyment of rights by all women in the Americas. Asuncion, Paraguay, June 4, 2014.

International:

Amnesty International

Regional:

Asociadas por lo Justo (JASS)

Comité de América Latina y el Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de las Mujeres (CLADEM)

Centro por la Justicia y el Derecho Internacional (CEJIL)

IPAS Centroamérica

La Plataforma Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, Democracia y Desarrollo (PIDHDD)

Red Regional de Organizaciones Civiles para las Migraciones

Red Solidaria contra la Impunidad A.C.

Argentina:

Centro de Estudios Legales y Sociales (CELS)

Brazil:

Associação Juízes para a Democracia (AJD)

Bolivia:

Comité de América Latina y el Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de las Mujeres (CLADEM)

La Oficina Jurídica para la Mujer

La Red Nacional Mujeres y Minería de Bolivia

Costa Rica:

Asociación Demográfica Costarricense

Alianza por tus Derechos

Centro de Investigación y Promoción para América Central de DDHH (CIPAC)

Centro Integral para los Derechos Humanos de los Migrantes (CIDEHUM)

Defensa de Niñas y Niños Internacional (DNI)

Red Feminista contra la Violencia hacia las Mujeres

Ecuador:

Centro de Documentación en Derechos Humanos “Segundo Montes Mozo S.J.”

El Salvador:

Agrupación Ciudadana por la Despenalización del Aborto Terapéutico, Ético y Eugenésico

Asociación Organización de Mujeres Salvadoreñas por la Paz

Asociación Salvadoreña de Derechos Humanos "Entre Amigos"

Coalición Salvadoreña para la Corte Penal Internacional

Colectiva Feminista para el Desarrollo Local

Espacio de Mujeres Lesbianas Salvadoreñas por la Diversidad

Grupo de Monitoreo Independiente de El Salvador

Instituto de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad Centroamericana José Simeón Cañas (IDHUCA)

Oficina de Tutela Legal Dra. María Julia Hernández

Guatemala:

Asociación de Familiares Detenidos-Desaparecidos (FAMDEGUA)

Asociación El refugio de la Niñez

Centro Internacional para Investigaciones en Derechos Humanos (CIIDH)

Centro Para la Acción Legal en Derechos Humanos (CALDH)

Colectivo de Investigaciones Sociales y Laborales (COISOLA)

Convergencia por los Derechos Humanos

Equipo de Estudios Comunitarios y Acción Psicosocial (ECAP)

Fundación Myrna Mack

Instituto de Estudios Comparados en Ciencias Penales de Guatemala (ICCPG)

Red de la No Violencia contra las Mujeres (REDNOVI)

Seguridad en Democracia (SEDEM)

Unidad de Protección a Defensoras y Defensores de Derechos Humanos (UDEFEGUA)

Honduras:

Asociación de Jueces por la Democracia (AJD)

Centro de Prevención, Tratamiento y Rehabilitación de las Víctimas de la Tortura y sus Familiares (CPTRT)

Convergencia por los Derechos Humanos

Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación de la Compañía de Jesús (ERIC)y Radio Progreso

Foro de Mujeres por la Vida

Movimiento Amplio por la Dignidad y la Justicia (MADJ)

Mexico:

Asistencia Legal por los Derechos Humanos (ASILEGAL)

Asociación de Familiares de Detenidos

Centro de Derechos Humanos Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas, A.C.

Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña  Tlachinollan, A. C.

Centro de Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres, A.C. (CEDEHM)

Centro para el Desarrollo Integral de la Mujer, A.C.

Colectivo Contra la Tortura y la Impunidad, A.C

Comisión de Solidaridad y Defensa de los Derechos Humanos, A. C (COSYDDHAC)

Grupo de Mujeres de San Cristobal de las Casas, A.C.

Nicaragua:

Asociación Nicaragüense de Transgéneras

Centro Nicaragüense de Derechos Humanos (CENIDH)

Centro de Apoyo Legal a Pueblos Indígenas (CALPI)

Centro por la Justicia y Derechos Humanos de la Costa Atlántica de Nicaragua (CEJUDHCAN)

Federación Coordinadora Nicaragüense de ONG que trabajan con la Niñez y la Adolescencia (CODENI)

Grupo Cívico Ética y Transparencia

Iniciativa desde la Diversidad Sexual por los Derechos Humanos en Nicaragua (IDSDH)

Movimiento Autónomo de Mujeres de Nicaragua (MAM)

Movimiento Contra el Abuso Sexual (MCAS)

Panama:

Coordinadora Nacional de Mujeres Indígenas de Panamá (CONAMUIP)

Centro de Asistencia Legal Popular (CEALP)

Movimiento 10 de Abril por la Defensa del Río Tabasará

Paraguay:

Agora Espacio Civil

Peru:

Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH)

Paz y Esperanza

Centro de Promoción y Defensa de los Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos (PROMSEX)

Venezuela:

El Comité de Familiares de las Víctimas de los sucesos ocurridos entre el 27 de febrero y los primeros días de marzo de 1989 (COFAVIC)

 

Press Contact

Daniela Araya

+506 22807473

daraya@cejil.org


Again Honduras does not comply with protection measures granted by the IACHR

Another beneficiary of precautionary measures is murdered

San Jose, May 5, 2014. Yesterday, May 4, Mr. Orlando Orellana, president of the Patronato de la Comunidad de Cerrito Lindo (Community Leaders of Cerrito Lindo) in Sand Pedro Sula, Honduras was murdered. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) had granted Mr. Orellana precautionary measures (protection measures).

Mon, 05/05/2014

Foto Ilustrativa Honduras, con créditosSan Jose, May 5, 2014. Yesterday, May 4, Mr. Orlando Orellana, president of the Patronato de la Comunidad de Cerrito Lindo (Community Leaders of Cerrito Lindo) in Sand Pedro Sula, Honduras was murdered. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) had granted Mr. Orellana precautionary measures (protection measures).

The events occurred around 12:50 P.M. when Mr. Orellana was on his way to a meeting on how to handle matters related to his community. At that time, two unknown subjects approached him in a taxi and shot at Mr. Orellana several times killing him.

The IACHR granted the Cerrito Lindo community precautionary measures in 2005 due to a request made by the Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación de la Compañía de Jesús (ERIC) and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL). The measures were granted due to a number of violent acts committed against members of the community stemming from a dispute on the property they occupied.

According to the villagers, their property lots were illegally sold to them by a local company. Becoming aware of the illegality in the buying and selling of the property, the inhabitants began a series of legal activities and protests to resolve the situation of the lots they had bought in good faith. The complaints unleashed a series of attacks against the members of the Cerrito Lindo colony, including violent evictions, death threats, people being followed and murders.

In effect, including the death of Mr. Orellana, there have been seven murders of community members under the precautionary measures including: Paulino Herníquez, murdered March 17, 2004; Jonni Orlando Aceituno Varela, murdered June 18, 2004; Héctor José Ulloa and Gilmar Santiafo Mejía, run over in suspicious and unclear circumstances on March 27, 2004, and January 26, 2006, respectively; Eligio Mejía, murdered February 5, 2006; and Orfilia Amparo Mejía, murdered March 26, 2012. None of these deaths have been clarified nor have they had effective measures of protection implemented.

“The situation in Honduras is insolent and the lack of protection of those who defend human rights is evident. The State of Honduras is internationally responsible for its failure in its duty to protect the Cerrito Lindo community members as well as for its failure to investigate these regrettable events,” stated Marcia Aguiluz, CEJIL’s Program Director for Central America and Mexico.

In addition, it is particularly concerning that in less than one month, two beneficiaries of precautionary measures have been murdered. It is also worth recalling the violent murder on April 11 of Carlos Mejía Orellana, the Radio Progreso collaborator.

CEJIL urges the state authorities to comply with their duty to exercise due diligence and to adopt all the necessary measures to investigate the events as well as to identify those responsible. At the same time, CEJIL reiterates its call for the adoption of an adequate mechanism for the protection of human rights defenders that includes beneficiaries of measures of protection granted by the bodies of the Inter-American Human Rights System.

Photo credit: El Heraldo

Related Links: CEJIL regrets the murder of a Radio Progreso’s worker in Honduras

Press Contact

Daniela Araya

+506 22807473

daraya@cejil.org

 

 

Threats against Judicial Independence Continue in Guatemala

Intimidation efforts continue against Judge Yassmín Barrios

San Jose, Costa Rica. May 2, 2014. On April 28, Judge Yassmín Barrios’s appeal of the decision of the Honor Tribunal of the Association of Lawyers and Notaries of Guatemala (Tribunal de Honor del Colegio de Abogados y Notarios de Guatemala, CANG) was rejected by the Assembly of Presidents of Professional Schools of Guatemala (Asamblea de Presidentes de Colegios Profesionales de Guatemala). The decision entails, among other sanctions, Judge Barrios’ suspension from practicing law for one year.

Mon, 05/05/2014

Foto Ilustrativa Yassmín Barrios, créditos reservadosSan Jose, Costa Rica. May 2, 2014. On April 28, Judge Yassmín Barrios’s appeal of the decision of the Honor Tribunal of the Association of Lawyers and Notaries of Guatemala (Tribunal de Honor del Colegio de Abogados y Notarios de Guatemala, CANG) was rejected by the Assembly of Presidents of Professional Schools of Guatemala (Asamblea de Presidentes de Colegios Profesionales de Guatemala). The decision entails, among other sanctions, Judge Barrios’ suspension from practicing law for one year.

As stated in one of CEJIL’s previous press releases, the decision stems from the 2013 conviction process of the ex-generals José Mauricio Rodríguez and Efraín Ríos Montt for committing genocide and crimes against humanity against the Ixil community. The body concluded that Judge Barrios had disrespected and publically humiliated Moisés Galindo, who stood as the defense for the accused José Mauricio, due to a jurisdictional decision made by the High Risk Tribunal A, of which Judge Barrios is a member.

In the Assembly of Presidents’ judgment, released on April 30, the body confirmed the alleged offense, and while it modified the punishment to a private reprimand, it did not analyze the lack of competence of the Honor Tribunal to discipline judges for their actions.

Viviana Krsticevic, CEJIL’s Executive Director, declared that, “the Assembly of Presidents of Professional Schools’ recent judgment is objectionable as it validates the decision of a body that has no jurisdiction, which affects Judge Barrios’s judicial independence and sends a general message of intimidation to members of the judiciary.”

CEJIL regrets the persistent efforts of intimidation and delegitimization against Judge Barrios and reminds the State authorities of their obligation to protect and guarantee her life and personal integrity, as ordered by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights when it granted her precautionary measures. Likewise, CEJIL calls on the State of Guatemala to respect and guarantee judicial independence and to condemn any undue interference that intends to undermine this important principle.

Photo credit: CB24 TV

Related links:

Guatemalan bar association puts judicial independence in danger

Press Contact

Daniela Araya

+506 22807473

daraya@cejil.org

 

 

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