Empowering human rights defenders

Summaries of Jurisprudence: Gender-based Violence. 2nd Edition Updated

CEJIL presents a new title to its collection of Summaries of Jurisprudence, this time dedicated to Gender Violence.

This publication includes a selection of texts of decisions from international human rights organs related to the protection of women victims of violence. The compilation provides a solid body of jurisprudence that allows one to obtain a broad panorama of the reality of women in a variety of contexts, revealing the indisputable relevance of gender violence in the world, even further than the advances in regulation material.

We hope that this will be a useful tool that contributes to the defense of human rights and the eradication of one of the most tolerated and silenced human rights violations as such is the violence exercised against women.


Type of publication:Compilation of jurisprudence
Full version available in:
Year: 2011
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Summaries of Jurisprudence: Health and Reproductive Rights

CEJIL is delighted to present a new book to its collection of Tools for the Protection of Human Rights: Summaries of Jurisprudence, this time dedicated to Health and Reproductive Rights.

The human rights protection bodies recognize the access to medical care, including reproductive health, as a basic right. Nonetheless, the decisions included in this volume illustrate some of the grave deficiencies in the effective enjoyment of these rights, directly affecting women’s right to choose regarding maternity, accessing health information, or to be respected in their autonomy and privacy, among others.

These pages compile decisions and judgments that constitute more relevant jurisprudence in relation to health and reproductive rights. We hope that this book will be a useful tool that contributes to the defense of those rights.


Type of publication:Compilation of jurisprudence
Full version available in:
Year: 2012
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International Day Against Homophobia & Transphobia

Thu, 05/17/2012 (All day)
Globally
Globally

World Press Freedom Day

Thu, 05/03/2012 (All day)
Globally
Globally

Human rights in the Inter-American System. Compilation of instruments. 2011 Edition.


Type of publication:Compilation of law
Full version available in:
Year: 2011
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Human rights in the Inter-American system. Compilation of instruments. 2009 edition.

Los Derechos Humanos en el Sistema Interamericano. Compilación de Instrumentos.

El Centro por la Justicia y el Derecho Internacional (CEJIL) se complace en presentar la sexta edición actualizada de su publicación Derechos Humanos en el Sistema Interamericano: Compilación de Instrumentos.

Desde la primera versión de este compendio de normativa interamericana sobre protección y defensa de los derechos humanos –editada en 1997- CEJIL se ha propuesto con esta compilación tornar más accesible a distintos públicos el conocimiento del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos desarrollado en el continente americano, así como el uso de las herramientas que el sistema interamericano (SI) pone a disposición de víctimas y defensores de derechos humanos.

La obra recopila las Declaraciones, Tratados, Protocolos y Principios que conforman la normativa fundamental del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos en el ámbito interamericano, complementándola con aquellos textos que reglamentan la composición y funcionamiento de la Comisión y Corte Interamericana (Estatutos y Reglamentos).

Esta sexta edición actualizada incluye las últimas modificaciones a los Reglamentos de la Comisión y la Corte introducidas en 2009, que afectan a aspectos centrales del Sistema como son las reglas aplicables a la fase de admisibilidad de peticiones, las medidas cautelares de protección, el papel de las víctimas en el litigio ante la Corte Interamericana, o cuestiones de representación legal, entre otras.

Adicionalmente, en esta nueva edición presentamos un cuadro que cumple con la intención de ofrecer de forma ilustrativa un panorama completo acerca del estado de ratificaciones de los instrumentos del sistema interamericano de derechos humanos. A su vez, la forma en que se expone la información permite tener una mirada abarcadora e integral acerca del grado de involucramiento de los Estados miembros de la OEA en el SI.


Type of publication:Compilation of law
Full version available in:
Year: 2009
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CEJIL: Summary of the 2013 Annual Report of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

On April 24, 2014, The President of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), Tracy Robinson, presented the 2013 Annual Report before the Committee on Juridical and Political Affairs of the OAS Permanent Council.

This is the first annual report prepared under the guidelines of the new Rules of Procedure of the IACHR, adopted in August of 2013 as a result of the OAS reflection process. The Rules of Procedure establish new guidelines and standards in the evaluation of the state of human rights in the region.

Sat, 05/17/2014

2014 05 Foto de la Presentación del Informe de la CIDHOn April 24, 2014, The President of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), Tracy Robinson, presented the 2013 Annual Report before the Committee on Juridical and Political Affairs of the OAS Permanent Council.

This is the first annual report prepared under the guidelines of the new Rules of Procedure of the IACHR, adopted in August of 2013 as a result of the OAS reflection process. The Rules of Procedure establish new guidelines and standards in the evaluation of the state of human rights in the region.

As a result, the 2013 Annual Report is divided into six chapters.

Chapter I addresses the activities conducted by the IACHR in its relation with the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and with other regional and universal bodies of human rights. According to the report, the IACHR submitted 11 contentious cases to the jurisdiction of the Court, one less than in 2012 and 48% less than in 2011. Four cases were submitted against Peru, two against Honduras, and one against Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico, Panama and Venezuela. Of these, three had indigenous and tribal communities as victims, two were related to illegal detentions and torture and two to extrajudicial executions, among other affected rights. On the other hand, there was only one petition made to the Court for a provisional measure, while in 2012 there were four made and in 2011 there were seven.

Chapter II addresses the protection of human rights from the perspective of the system of cases and precautionary measures. According to the Report, in 2013 2061 petitions were received, almost 100 more than in the previous year and 400 more than were received in 2011. This shows a 20% increase in the number of petitions received since 2011.

Of the petitions it received in 2013, the IACHR opened 736, that is to say, a total of 35.7%; this reflects a diminution of 41.3% of the total number of open petitions in the previous year. Of these, only 123 were accepted for processing leaving out 613 petitions. Therefore, of the total petitions analyzed, 16.7% were accepted for processing.

At the end of 2013, a total of 8548 petitions were pending a resolution before the IACHR, 1753 of which are in the phases of admissibility and merits. There were a total of 116 reports in which the IACHR made decisions of admissibility (44), inadmissibility (9), merits (19), friendly settlement (6) or archive (38) during the 2013 period. This shows a decrease from the previous year when 125 reports were approved. It also shows a substantive reduction in comparison to the 165 reports approved in 2011. However, this year there were more admissibility reports and less inadmissibility in relation to the previous year. Additionally, three Merits Reports were published in accordance with article 51(3) of the American Convention on Human Rights, whereas only one was published in the previous year. Two were emitted against the United States and one against Mexico.

In relation to precautionary measures, the Commission received 400 petitions, 10% less than in 2012. Of those, it only granted 26, meaning 6.5% of the total. This shows a diminution in comparison to the previous year, in which 35 measures were granted out of the 448 petitions; in 2011, 57 measures were granted out of the 422 petitions. 12 measures were granted prior to the effective date of the new regulations and 14 thereafter.

Of the 400 precautionary measures petitioned, the majority were filed against Mexico (85), Colombia (62) and Argentina (31). However, the Commission primarily issued measures against Cuba (5), Haiti (4) and Mexico (3).

Country visits doubled in 2013 from the three that occurred in 2012 to the six that took place in 2013. The IACHR conducted in loco visits to the Dominican Republic, Suriname, Argentina, Honduras, Canada and Guatemala. The visits addressed a variety of issues including the right to nationality, identity, equality before the law and non-discrimination, women’s rights and the rights of indigenous communities, among others.

Chapter III reports the activities developed by the seven rapporteurships and the two bodies. A separate chapter reports the work of the Special Rapporteurhip for Freedom of Expression.

For the first time, the work conducted by the Unit on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ESCR), created in November 2012, is presented. In April 2014 the Unit established itself as the Special Rapporteurship on ESCR. Furthermore, the Report announces that in November 2013, the IACHR decided to create the Rapporteurship on the Rights of the LGBTI persons, which began working on February 1, 2014.

The following thematic and country reports were approved in 2013: (1) The Report of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights on Persons Deprived of Liberty in Honduras; (2) The Rights of Boys and Girls to a Family. Alternative Care. Ending Institutionalization in the Americas; (3) Guarantees for the Independence of Justice Operators in the Americas; (4) Report on the Impact of the Friendly Settlement Process; (6) Report on the Use of Pretrial Detention in the Americas; (7) Report on the Human Rights of migrants and other persons in the context of human mobility in Mexico; (8) Truth, Justice and Reparation: Fourth Report on the Situation of Human Rights in Colombia. The previous is an unusual number in comparison of 2012, in which not a single thematic report was released.

Split into two sections, Chapter IV contemplates the new methodology that follows the 2013 approved Rules of Procedure.

The first section presents a panorama on the human rights situation in the hemisphere, an analysis that comes from the monitoring conducted by the Commission. The IACHR issued 103 press releases. In 22 of them it reported murders or the persecution of human rights defenders and reporters, including attacks against judges and organizations for their actions. Furthermore, the IACHR gave special attention to the violent deaths that occurred in the penitentiary centers of Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela and Bolivia. It also gave special attention to the situation of LGBTI persons.

In addition to the above, this section also includes information requested from States in relation to specific violations related to four key issues: the effect on the right to personal liberty in relation to the Guantanamo military base and the responsibility of the United States in the compliance of the issued precautionary measures; the situation of Ecuador and the effects on the right to freedom of expression; the independence and impartiality of the operators of justice in the region; and lastly, the effect on the right to nationality and non-discrimination in relation to the Judgment TC/0168 issued September 23, 2013 by the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic.

The second section reports on the specific human rights situation in some states selected by the Commissioners in accordance with the criteria, methodology and procedures set out in the new Rules of Procedure, and highlights critical situations affecting human rights. The Commission, by an absolute majority, decided to include three member States in the second section: Cuba, Honduras and Venezuela.

Regarding the universality of the Inter-American System, the IACHR shows that as of June 2013, only 7 Member States (20%) had ratified all the Inter-American human rights treaties: Argentina, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay and Uruguay. Because of this, the IACHR calls on the other Member States to ratify all the treaties and asks them to remove the internal obstacles to reach this objective.

Chapter V is left pending for the 2014 Report, evidencing the monitor of recommendations given by the IACHR in its country or thematic reports specific to a single country, Jamaica. The reports are currently still undergoing consultation with the State and civil society.

Chapter VI of the Report shows that a precarious financial situation continues to persist in the IACHR. Even though the OAS increased the IACHR’s budget by US$65,000 for the 2014 fiscal year, the IACHR continues to depend on external funds to minimally respond to the growing demand of the countries in the Americas. As of October 31, 2013, the specific funds generally represented 46% of the money the Executive Secretariat takes in to perform its various functions and 49% for its implementation. Additionally, the IACHR reported the approval of the increased budget for the Commissioners’ fees from US$2,000 to US$4,000 monthly.

After the presentation of the Annual Report, the majority of the States publically expressed the need for the IACHR to be able to count on the financial conditions that permit it to fully dedicate itself to the persons and groups of the region that have multiple necessities for protection and gravely suffer effects to their essential rights. However, to date, the political bodies of the OAS continue without adopting the necessary measures to guarantee the adequate funding of the System.

CEJIL, DPLF and WOLA express their concern for the appointment of retired General Daniel Urresti as Minister of the Interior in Peru

Urresti is currently under investigation for his participation in the murder of a journalist, Hugo Bustíos, in 1988

Washington D.C., July 8, 2014. In the wake of the President of the Republic of Peru’s, Ollanta Humala, recent appointment of retired General Daniel Urresti as Minister of the Interior, the signing organizations express their deep concern about the new Minister as he is a subject of a criminal investigation by the commission for grave human rights violations that occurred during Peru’s internal armed conflict.

Thu, 08/21/2014

Washington D.C., July 8, 2014. In the wake of the President of the Republic of Peru’s, Ollanta Humala, recent appointment of retired General Daniel Urresti as Minister of the Interior, the signing organizations express their deep concern about the new Minister as he is a subject of a criminal investigation by the commission for grave human rights violations that occurred during Peru’s internal armed conflict.

As stated by the Institute for Legal Defense (Instituto de Defensa Legal, IDL) last week, Urresti is under investigation as the alleged mastermind of the murder of Hugo Bustíos, journalist and correspondent for the magazine, “Carretas,” on November 24, 1988. Bustíos, along with his colleague Eduardo Rojas Arce, were investigating the murder of two civilians in the outskirts of the city of Huanta, after having asked the Chief of the Castropampa Military Base, Víctor La Vera Hernández, for permission to access the area. On the way to Huanta, Bustíos and Rojas Arce were attacked with gun fire. Bustíos was hit with a bullet, lost control of the motorcycle he was driving and fell. Rojas Arce was able to save himself. The attackers placed a detonating explosive over Bustíos’s injured body, causing his death. Urrestí, an Army captain at that time, worked as Head of the S-2 Military Intelligence Branch (Sección de Inteligencia S-2) at the Castropampa base in Ayacucho.

The initial investigation was initiated by the military court, but subsequently closed. In light of this, CEJIL and other organizations, including the national headquarters of COMISEDH, brought the case before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, which in 1997 found the Peruvian State responsible for the murder of Hugo Bustíos and the attack on Eduardo Rojas Arce.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission resumed the investigation on the case, and in 2007, the National Criminal Court condemned officers Víctor La Vera Hernández and Amador Vidal Sanbertoa, 17 and 15 years old, respectively, for the murder and attempted murder of Bustíos and Rojas Arce. The investigation continued in order to establish the identity of others responsible, and on June 17, 2013, the judiciary ordered to open an investigation against Urresti. It stated that on November 24, 1988, both journalists were, “ambushed and attacked by members of the Peruvian military from the Castropampa Military Base under the orders of Officer Daniel Belisario Urresti Elera known as “Arturo,” along with the participation of Sergeant Johny José Zapata Acuña known as “Centurión” and other unidentified members of the Military.”

Along with other pieces of evidence, the existence of the order to open an investigation of Urresti has been supported by statements made by members of the Peruvian military at the Castropampa Base in November 1988. Based on these statements, Urresti is being investigated for his role as the mastermind of the murder of Bustíos and the attempted murder of Rojas Arce, both classified as crimes against humanity.

As noted by Viviana Krsticevic, CEJIL’s Executive Director, “the IACHR determined that Peru was responsible for the murder of Bustíos and for violating the personal integrity of Rojas Arce, as well as violating the freedom of expression of both victims because they were journalists. The Peruvian President’s decision to offer a public position to a person under investigation for grave acts sends a message of disrespect for the work of the judicial power in combating impunity, as well as being a direct affront to the victims of grave human rights violations in Peru.”

For Katya Salazar, Executive Director of DPLF, “this case is emblematic because it was investigated by the Peruvian Truth Commission, which recommended the investigation and prosecution of all those responsible. President Humala’s decision to “evaluate the case” and to conclude that there is not sufficient evidence is an attack on judicial independence and implies “rewarding” a person accused of these grave violations.”

Joe-Marie, a Senior Fellow at WOLA, considers that, “the President should rectify this decision because it is detrimental to the process followed in Peru to find truth, justice and reparation for victims of the internal armed conflict in Peru, and it gravely affects the consolidation of democratic institutions. Urresti should be removed from his position and brought to justice for this case. Additionally, the Ollanta Humala government should reaffirm its promise to protect the physical integrity of relatives and witnesses in this case as well as in others under investigation.”

Based on the above, the organizations respectfully ask the Peruvian authorities to respect the actions of the Judicial Power and to guarantee the independence of the investigations and procedures that are followed to determine the responsibilities of all the perpetrators of the murder of Hugo Bustíos. Additionally, the organizations urge the Judicial Power to suspend General Urresti from his post as Minister of the Interior until his criminal role in the Bustíos case is clarified.

Links of interest:

  • Order to open the investigation against Daniel Urresti (auto de apertura de instrucción), June 17, 2013, (Spanish only)

http://www.scribd.com/doc/232302402/Daniel-Urresti-Autoapertorio-del-caso-del-periodista-Hugo-Bustios

Press Contact

Daniela Araya

+506 22807473

daraya@cejil.org

20 years since the historic adoption of the Inter-American Convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the historic adoption of the Inter-American Convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons, adopted in the 24th Ordinary Period of Sessions of the General Assembly of the OAS that took place in Belem do Para, Brazil in June 1994.

Organizations and human rights defenders in the regions make their position public on the pending obligations of the States to eradicate and punish the disappearance of persons, while recognizing the fundamental roles the Commission and Court of Human Rights have played in interpreting the scope of the rights they protect.

A the same time, the organizations and defenders alike make a strong call to the universalization of the Convention, which at this date has only been ratified by 15 countries. See the complete text of the Statement with its signatures here.

Mon, 06/09/2014

Foto Ilustrativa Desparición ForzadaToday marks the 20th anniversary of the historic adoption of the Inter-American Convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons, adopted in the 24th Ordinary Period of Sessions of the General Assembly of the OAS that took place in Belem do Para, Brazil in June 1994.

Organizations and human rights defenders in the regions make their position public on the pending obligations of the States to eradicate and punish the disappearance of persons, while recognizing the fundamental roles the Commission and Court of Human Rights have played in interpreting the scope of the rights they protect.

A the same time, the organizations and defenders alike make a strong call to the universalization of the Convention, which at this date has only been ratified by 15 countries. See the complete text of the Statement with its signatures here.

20 years after the Convention of Belem do Para: commitments must be strengthened so women can live without violence

Asuncion, Wednesday, June 4, 2014. The signing organizations, in the framework of the Forty-fourth Period of Ordinary Sessions of the General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS), celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the adoption of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence Against Women (Convention of “Belem do Para”), which to this date has been ratified by 32 of the 34 members of the OAS. The organizations especially note that this Inter-American human rights treaty has the highest number of ratifications, showing a political commitment to the elimination of all types of violence against women.

Fri, 06/06/2014

Fotografía Belém do ParáAsuncion, Wednesday, June 4, 2014. The signing organizations, in the framework of the Forty-fourth Period of Ordinary Sessions of the General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS), celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the adoption of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence Against Women (Convention of “Belem do Para”), which to this date has been ratified by 32 of the 34 members of the OAS. The organizations especially note that this Inter-American human rights treaty has the highest number of ratifications, showing a political commitment to the elimination of all types of violence against women.

The signing organizations appreciate that when the Convention of Belem do Para came into force, the majority of States pushed forward national legislative processes that led to the creation of laws aimed at fighting domestic violence. Nonetheless, the organizations stress that these advances have been insufficient at the level of prevention, investigation and the punishment of the violence against women. In addition, the complexity and impact that this type of violence represents has been hindered from being comprehensively addressed.

It is necessary to restate that the obligations established by the Convention of Belem do Para require the States to design and implement comprehensive public policies that take into account the different spaces where violence against women occurs, such as the situation of violence as well as the obstacles that women human rights defenders face to carry out their work.

At the same time, the signing organizations are troubled by the persistence of generalized impunity in relation to the investigation, prosecution, and punishment that state and non-state actors face for committing violent crimes against women.

On the other hand, in the framework of the current plenary sessions of the General Assembly of the OAS, which are centered on the issue of “Development with Social Inclusion,” it is essential to note that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has already recognized that there is a close link between the elimination of poverty and the protection and exercise of all women’s rights.

In turn, the signing organizations consider that putting into practice what is established in article 9 of the Convention is urgent and cannot be delayed, in the sense of especially protecting women that find themselves in situations worsened by vulnerability including children, the elderly, indigenous women, and women affected by poverty, violence and armed conflict. This will contribute to an adequate approach to guarantee women’s right to a life of dignity, free of violence.

The “factual and legal” inequality that affects women, as well as violence against women, continues to be expressions of the historically unequal power relations between women and men that structure our societies. This perspective, derived from the mandate of the Convention, should help address the analysis of the difficulties that still persist, and the proposals to overcome them.

20 years after the signing of the Convention of Belem do Para, the signing organizations urge the American States to firmly establish public policies and other effective actions in order to:

  • Fight against the persistence of gender stereotypes based on concepts of inferiority or subordination between men and women, as well as practices that promote the exploitation of women’s bodies, which perpetuate the historical discrimination that underlines violent acts against women;
  • Comprehensively address the diverse manifestations of violence that confront women in the Americas (lack of access to reproductive health, maternal mortality, lack of access to sexual education, discrimination, sexual violence, domestic violence, criminalization of abortion and attacks against human rights defenders, among others);
  • Broadly discuss, adopt and implement laws, legal procedures and public policies taking into account the diversity of women that live in the region and considering the complexity of the problem;
  • Guarantee the compilation of adequate and disaggregated statistics that allow the evaluation of the effectiveness of the measures of prevention, punishment and eradication of violence against women;
  • Incorporate a gender and ethnic perspective in the administration of justice;
  • Adequately comply with the decisions of the Inter-American System’s bodies, particularly in cases relating to discrimination and violence against women;
  • Comply with the duty to exercise due diligence to prevent violence against women, including domestic violence; in this sense the States should investigate, prosecute and punish the perpetrators (public officials or private individuals), and provide complete reparation to the women who are victims of the violence; and
  • Incorporate transversal gender indicators in public programs and proposals to measure the advancement of women’s human rights.

On the twentieth anniversary of the Convention of Belem do Para, the organizations remember that violence against women is a human rights violation and call for the full enjoyment of rights by all women in the Americas. Asuncion, Paraguay, June 4, 2014.

International:

Amnesty International

Regional:

Asociadas por lo Justo (JASS)

Comité de América Latina y el Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de las Mujeres (CLADEM)

Centro por la Justicia y el Derecho Internacional (CEJIL)

IPAS Centroamérica

La Plataforma Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, Democracia y Desarrollo (PIDHDD)

Red Regional de Organizaciones Civiles para las Migraciones

Red Solidaria contra la Impunidad A.C.

Argentina:

Centro de Estudios Legales y Sociales (CELS)

Brazil:

Associação Juízes para a Democracia (AJD)

Bolivia:

Comité de América Latina y el Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de las Mujeres (CLADEM)

La Oficina Jurídica para la Mujer

La Red Nacional Mujeres y Minería de Bolivia

Costa Rica:

Asociación Demográfica Costarricense

Alianza por tus Derechos

Centro de Investigación y Promoción para América Central de DDHH (CIPAC)

Centro Integral para los Derechos Humanos de los Migrantes (CIDEHUM)

Defensa de Niñas y Niños Internacional (DNI)

Red Feminista contra la Violencia hacia las Mujeres

Ecuador:

Centro de Documentación en Derechos Humanos “Segundo Montes Mozo S.J.”

El Salvador:

Agrupación Ciudadana por la Despenalización del Aborto Terapéutico, Ético y Eugenésico

Asociación Organización de Mujeres Salvadoreñas por la Paz

Asociación Salvadoreña de Derechos Humanos "Entre Amigos"

Coalición Salvadoreña para la Corte Penal Internacional

Colectiva Feminista para el Desarrollo Local

Espacio de Mujeres Lesbianas Salvadoreñas por la Diversidad

Grupo de Monitoreo Independiente de El Salvador

Instituto de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad Centroamericana José Simeón Cañas (IDHUCA)

Oficina de Tutela Legal Dra. María Julia Hernández

Guatemala:

Asociación de Familiares Detenidos-Desaparecidos (FAMDEGUA)

Asociación El refugio de la Niñez

Centro Internacional para Investigaciones en Derechos Humanos (CIIDH)

Centro Para la Acción Legal en Derechos Humanos (CALDH)

Colectivo de Investigaciones Sociales y Laborales (COISOLA)

Convergencia por los Derechos Humanos

Equipo de Estudios Comunitarios y Acción Psicosocial (ECAP)

Fundación Myrna Mack

Instituto de Estudios Comparados en Ciencias Penales de Guatemala (ICCPG)

Red de la No Violencia contra las Mujeres (REDNOVI)

Seguridad en Democracia (SEDEM)

Unidad de Protección a Defensoras y Defensores de Derechos Humanos (UDEFEGUA)

Honduras:

Asociación de Jueces por la Democracia (AJD)

Centro de Prevención, Tratamiento y Rehabilitación de las Víctimas de la Tortura y sus Familiares (CPTRT)

Convergencia por los Derechos Humanos

Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación de la Compañía de Jesús (ERIC)y Radio Progreso

Foro de Mujeres por la Vida

Movimiento Amplio por la Dignidad y la Justicia (MADJ)

Mexico:

Asistencia Legal por los Derechos Humanos (ASILEGAL)

Asociación de Familiares de Detenidos

Centro de Derechos Humanos Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas, A.C.

Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña  Tlachinollan, A. C.

Centro de Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres, A.C. (CEDEHM)

Centro para el Desarrollo Integral de la Mujer, A.C.

Colectivo Contra la Tortura y la Impunidad, A.C

Comisión de Solidaridad y Defensa de los Derechos Humanos, A. C (COSYDDHAC)

Grupo de Mujeres de San Cristobal de las Casas, A.C.

Nicaragua:

Asociación Nicaragüense de Transgéneras

Centro Nicaragüense de Derechos Humanos (CENIDH)

Centro de Apoyo Legal a Pueblos Indígenas (CALPI)

Centro por la Justicia y Derechos Humanos de la Costa Atlántica de Nicaragua (CEJUDHCAN)

Federación Coordinadora Nicaragüense de ONG que trabajan con la Niñez y la Adolescencia (CODENI)

Grupo Cívico Ética y Transparencia

Iniciativa desde la Diversidad Sexual por los Derechos Humanos en Nicaragua (IDSDH)

Movimiento Autónomo de Mujeres de Nicaragua (MAM)

Movimiento Contra el Abuso Sexual (MCAS)

Panama:

Coordinadora Nacional de Mujeres Indígenas de Panamá (CONAMUIP)

Centro de Asistencia Legal Popular (CEALP)

Movimiento 10 de Abril por la Defensa del Río Tabasará

Paraguay:

Agora Espacio Civil

Peru:

Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH)

Paz y Esperanza

Centro de Promoción y Defensa de los Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos (PROMSEX)

Venezuela:

El Comité de Familiares de las Víctimas de los sucesos ocurridos entre el 27 de febrero y los primeros días de marzo de 1989 (COFAVIC)

 

Press Contact

Daniela Araya

+506 22807473

daraya@cejil.org


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