CEJIL

CEJIL is accepting applications for its Virtual Course on Human Rigths and the Inter-American System

CEJIL is accepting applications from human rights defenders in Central America and Mexico to participate in its virtual course on, “the Inter-American System’s effective and efficient use of protection mechanisms,” which will take place in Spanish from June 16 to September 12, 2014.

The course looks to strengthen human rights organizations’ internal capacities, deepening the knowledge and debate on the Inter-American System’s tools.

For more details on the course and application process click here

Fri, 03/14/2014

CEJIL launches publication on the reforms to the IACHR Rules of Procedure

In the context of the 149th Period of Ordinary Sessions of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights,

the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) is delighted to invite you to the presentation of the publication:

"Notes on the Reforms of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Rules of Procedure: Changes resulting from the Process of Reflection, 2011-2013"

Thursday, October 31, 2013, 6:00pm
Mon, 10/28/2013

In the context of the 149th Period of Ordinary Sessions of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights,


the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) is delighted to invite you to the presentation of the publication:

"Notes on the Reforms of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Rules of Procedure: Changes resulting from the Process of Reflection, 2011-2013"

Opening Speech: José de Jesús Orozco, President of the IACHR

Presentation: Viviana Krsticevic, Executive Director of CEJIL

Closing Speech: Emilio Álvarez Icaza, Executive Secretary of the IACHR

The presentation will be followed by a toast.

Thursday, October 31, at 6:00pm

Padilha Vidal Room, IACHR, 1889 F Street, NW, Washington


Available in PDF format here (in Spanish)


Invitación al lanzamiento del libro de CEJIL

CEJIL will denounce the violations of the human rights of groups in vulnerable situations in the Americas

Eight thematic hearings before the IACHR will permit discussion on the situation of detained persons, women, human rights defenders, Trans persons, and others.

Washington D.C., Sunday, October 27, 2013 – As of Monday, October 28, 2013, the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) will participate in eight different thematic hearings before the Inter American Commission on Human Rights, in conjunction with numerous human rights organizations from across the American Continent.

With regards to the objectives of these hearings, CEJIL’s Executive Director Viviana Krsticevic stated that “their purpose is to make visible the vulnerable situation in which various populations are found, amongst them women, detained persons in Guantanamo, refugees, trans persons, and human rights defenders, with the aim of drawing the attention of American States to these issues so that they take swift actions that guarantee the rights of these people and groups.”

 

Sun, 10/27/2013

Washington D.C., Sunday, October 27, 2013 – As of Monday, October 28, 2013, the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) will participate in eight different thematic hearings before the Inter American Commission on Human Rights, in conjunction with numerous human rights organizations from across the American Continent.

With regards to the objectives of these hearings, CEJIL’s Executive Director Viviana Krsticevic stated that “their purpose is to make visible the vulnerable situation in which various populations are found, amongst them women, detained persons in Guantanamo, refugees, trans persons, and human rights defenders, with the aim of drawing the attention of American States to these issues so that they take swift actions that guarantee the rights of these people and groups.”

These thematic hearings form part of the 149th Period of Ordinary Sessions of the Commission.

The following issues are amongst those which will be addressed:

 

 

  • Human Rights Situation of Detainees at Guantánamo Naval Base, United States (Monday, October 28, 9:00 – 10:00 EST).
  • Human Rights of Migrants and Legislative Reforms in the United States (Monday, October 28, 2:00 – 3:00 EST).
  • Situation of Human Rights Defenders in Guatemala (Monday, October 28, 11:30-12:20 EST).
  • Implementation of Precautionary Measures in Honduras (Monday, October 28, 17:45-18:45 EST).
  • Reports of Violence against Trans People in El Salvador (Tuesday, October 29, 9:00-10:00 EST)
  • Situation of Violence against Women in the Americas (Tuesday, October 29, 15:15-16:15 EST)
  • Reports of Excessive Use of Force by the Police in Nicaragua (Tuesday, October 29, 17:45-18:46 EST)
  • Human Rights Situation of Refugees in the Americas (Thursday, October 31, 15:15-16:15)

 

 

Summaries of Jurisprudence: Gender-based Violence. 2nd Edition Updated

CEJIL presents a new title to its collection of Summaries of Jurisprudence, this time dedicated to Gender Violence.

This publication includes a selection of texts of decisions from international human rights organs related to the protection of women victims of violence. The compilation provides a solid body of jurisprudence that allows one to obtain a broad panorama of the reality of women in a variety of contexts, revealing the indisputable relevance of gender violence in the world, even further than the advances in regulation material.

We hope that this will be a useful tool that contributes to the defense of human rights and the eradication of one of the most tolerated and silenced human rights violations as such is the violence exercised against women.


Type of publication:Compilation of jurisprudence
Full version available in:
Year: 2011
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Summaries of Jurisprudence: Health and Reproductive Rights

CEJIL is delighted to present a new book to its collection of Tools for the Protection of Human Rights: Summaries of Jurisprudence, this time dedicated to Health and Reproductive Rights.

The human rights protection bodies recognize the access to medical care, including reproductive health, as a basic right. Nonetheless, the decisions included in this volume illustrate some of the grave deficiencies in the effective enjoyment of these rights, directly affecting women’s right to choose regarding maternity, accessing health information, or to be respected in their autonomy and privacy, among others.

These pages compile decisions and judgments that constitute more relevant jurisprudence in relation to health and reproductive rights. We hope that this book will be a useful tool that contributes to the defense of those rights.


Type of publication:Compilation of jurisprudence
Full version available in:
Year: 2012
Your opinion is very important and let us keep up to date ours tools. If you had the chance to use this publication please complete the evaluation form. Thanks in advance.

CEJIL will participate in six hearings and six working meetings during the 144th Sessions of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

Highlights on the agenda include the coup d’état in Honduras, indefinite detentions at Guantanamo and the attempt to weaken the Inter-American System

Washington D. C. March 22, 2012- Alongside over 20 civil society organizations from the Americas, the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) will participate in six public hearings and six private working meetings before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), in Washington D.C. from March 23 to 28.

Highlights among the public hearings include the case of the Honduran judges, who were dismissed by the Supreme Court, after the coup d´état of June 2009. The case is known as Guillermo Lopez Lone et al.

Thu, 03/22/2012

 
Washington D. C. March 22, 2012- Alongside over 20 civil society organizations from the Americas, the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) will participate in six public hearings and six private working meetings before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), in Washington D.C. from March 23 to 28.
 
Highlights among the public hearings include the case of the Honduran judges, who were dismissed by the Supreme Court, after the coup d´état of June 2009. The case is known as Guillermo Lopez Lone et al.
 
The remaining hearings will be thematic, presenting a broader picture of the situation of specific human rights violations in the region. The hearing Process of Strengthening the Inter-American Human Rights System will highlight the challenges facing the IACHR´s new composition and the attempt by some key States to weaken the institutions for the  protection of human rights in the Americas. The hearing is backed by over 50 organizations in the region.
 
CEJIL will participate in other thematic hearings that will focus on the State of Fundamental Freedoms and their Effect on the Protection of Human Rights in Honduras, Situation of Human Rights Defenders and Access to Justice in Guatemala, The general Human Rights Situation in Nicaragua and Threats to Judicial Independence in Central America.
 
On the other hand, the IACHR has convened six private working meetings on Saturday, March 24. These are related to the failure of the United States to implement protection measures for detainees at Guantanamo, the non-compliance of a friendly settlement in a rural violence case in Brazil (Fazenda Ubá); a friendly settlement with Colombia (Alba Lucía Rodríguez Cardona); the monitoring of the reparations of a Peruvian case (Cases of joint Press Release); and the non-compliance of Colombia with the precautionary measures for the Jose Alvear Restrepo Lawyers´Collective (CCAJAR), among others.
 
The hearings will be broadcast live via Internet here.
 
The schedule of CEJIL hearings can be found here.
 
 
 
 
 
Contact in Washington:
Milli Legrain
+(1) 202-319 3000
mlegrain@cejil.org
 

Center for Justice and International Law issues statement on the Mapiripán v. Colombia case

Washington D.C., November 1, 2011 – As is public knowledge, Mariela Contreras, a witness in the Mapiripán v. Colombia case decided by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in 2005, has allegedly recently retracted the statements she gave in Colombian proceedings in 2002 and before the Inter-American Court in 2005. This has generated a vigorous debate in Colombia over the magnitude of the crimes that were committed, the penalties given to those responsible, and the duties of both the justice administration, as well as the lawyers representing the accusers.

Tue, 11/01/2011

Washington D.C., November 1, 2011 – As is public knowledge, Mariela Contreras, a witness in the Mapiripán v. Colombia case decided by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in 2005, has allegedly recently retracted the statements she gave in Colombian proceedings in 2002 and before the Inter-American Court in 2005. This has generated a vigorous debate in Colombia over the magnitude of the crimes that were committed, the penalties given to those responsible, and the duties of both the justice administration, as well as the lawyers representing the accusers.

First, it is essential to clarify that there is no doubt in either the domestic or international arena as to the occurrence of the massacre. Nor is there any doubt as to the shared role of the AUC and members of security forces in events, which were widely reported in the press and for which both the state and the paramilitaries themselves have recognized their responsibility. Second, CEJIL shares the concern of the justice administration, our colleagues from the José Alvear Restrepo Lawyers’ Collective (CCAJAR), the government, and Colombian society when faced with the possibility that this witness may have manipulated the process at the national and international level with false declarations, and we are confident that this situation will be properly investigated and clarified.
 
On the other hand, it should be emphasized that CEJIL and CCAJAR began representing Mariela Contreras in the international proceedings in 2003, four years after the initial petition in the Mapiripán case was presented before the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights, and one year after her declaration to the Attorney General of Colombia.
 
Moreover, her statement was entirely consistent with the statements of her children, the forensic evidence, evidence of relevant documents, the testimony of the authorities, among them judge Novoa Cortes, as well as with the statements of expert witnesses, victims and their family members. When litigating a case, the evidence is fundamentally based on the entire body of evidence that exists at the internal level and on all the information provided by the State. Additionally, it should be noted that the Colombian state itself, represented by the Executive authority, repeatedly included Mrs. Contreras among the family members of the victims of the massacre during the international proceedings and assumed international responsibility for the crimes committed.
 
The uncertainty over the number of victims of the Mapiripán massacre is not a new issue, but rather was clearly identified during international litigation. Indeed, the difficulty in reaching a precise number of victims was identified by the Inter-American Court in their 2005 judgment as one of the shortcomings of the state’s investigation. In that judgment, the Court ordered the state to conduct all due diligence necessary to individualize and identify each executed and disappeared victim and their family members within a reasonable amount of time. That same Court reaffirmed that, precisely because of the way in which the massacre was planned and executed, it was possible that, in exceptional cases, the whereabouts of persons previously taken for dead could be established in the course of a criminal investigation.
 
In light of this information, CEJIL and the other human rights organizations connected to this case remain committed to establishing the truth, bringing those responsible to justice and determining the reparations owed to the victims.
 
Contact in Washington Milli Legrain mlegrain@cejil.org Tel (1) 202 319 3000
 

Human rights in the Inter-American System. Compilation of instruments. 2011 Edition.


Type of publication:Compilation of law
Full version available in:
Year: 2011
Partial download options in:

Spanish


English

  (59,15 KB)


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Inter-American Court of Human Rights says Uruguay must investigate and punish dictatorship crimes

The Gelman case is emblematic of the crimes against humanity perpetrated under Operation Condor in the 1970´s

Washington D.C and Buenos Aires, March 24, 2011- Late last night, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights issued a ruling condemning Uruguay for the forced disappearance of Maria Claudia García Iruretagoyena de Gelman and the birth in captivity of her daughter during the mid 1970’s. The events took place under Operation Condor, a mutual cooperation agreement between the dictatorships of Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, Brazil and Uruguay to eliminate those regarded as political dissidents. The ruling renders the 1986 law, known as the Ley de la Caducidad de la Pretensión Punitiva del Estado, ineffective and therefore opens up the possibility for the punishment of crimes against humanity committed under the military dictatorship in Uruguay (1973-1985). The ruling is binding as Uruguay is a signatory of the American Convention on Human Rights and recognizes the jurisdiction of the Inter-American Court.

Wed, 03/23/2011

Washington D.C and Buenos Aires, March 24, 2011- Late last night, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights issued a ruling condemning Uruguay for the forced disappearance of Maria Claudia García Iruretagoyena de Gelman and the birth in captivity of her daughter during the mid 1970’s. The events took place under Operation Condor, a mutual cooperation agreement between the dictatorships of Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, Brazil and Uruguay to eliminate those regarded as political dissidents. The ruling renders the 1986 law, known as the Ley de la Caducidad de la Pretensión Punitiva del Estado, ineffective and therefore opens up the possibility for the punishment of crimes against humanity committed under the military dictatorship in Uruguay (1973-1985). The ruling is binding as Uruguay is a signatory of the American Convention on Human Rights and recognizes the jurisdiction of the Inter-American Court.
 
Maria Claudia García Iruretagoyena was abducted in Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1976.  She was seven months pregnant when she was transferred to a clandestine detention center in Uruguay, where she gave birth to a girl, Macarena. Maria Claudia was later the victim of forced disappearance and her remains were never found. In 1999, Macarena’s grandfather, renowned argentine poet Juan Gelman, tracked down his granddaughter by his own means after more than 20 years.
 
“This sentence is paradigmatic for Uruguay as it means the end of a law that has stood in the way of truth and justice for 25 years. It represents a victory for the victims, their families and a large part of Uruguayan society that has tirelessly sought to challenge a law resulting from a political agreement and guaranteeing impunity to the perpetrators of crimes against humanity. For Juan and María Macarena Gelman, this is the starting point in their quest for truth and the easing of their pain”, said Ariela Peralta, Deputy Director of the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) and lawyer for the case.
 
This is the first case against Uruguay to reach the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. CEJIL brought the case to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) in May 2006. In January 2010 the case was submitted to the Court after Uruguay refused to follow recommendations issued by the IACHR.
 
Although the Uruguayan Government has used the 1989 referendum as a reason for maintaining the law, Uruguay can no longer refer to domestic law as a pretext for not complying with its international obligations. In words of Liliana Tojo, CEJIL´s Program Director for Bolivia and the Southern Cone: “The Court has finally dictated that Uruguay cannot continue to seek excuses for maintaining impunity for the victims of torture and other horrendous crimes.”
 
In addition, the judgment clearly states that investigations regarding the forced disappearance of Maria Claudia must be pursued with a view to locating her remains and bringing the perpetrators to justice. According to the Court, Uruguay must also establish criminal and administrative responsibility in accordance with International Law.
 
The Court ordered a series of reparations which include for Uruguay to adopt a series of policies to ensure integral reparation for the victims as well as a public apology for the crimes committed.
 
This case not only illustrates the scope of Operation Condor, but also the impunity that developed in Uruguay and is still in place today. Viviana Krsticevic, CEJIL´s Executive Director  said that “Today we celebrate the International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims with an outstanding judgment from  the Inter- American Court of Human Rights which will contribute to re-writing the history of Uruguay. Uruguay must now face the challenge that other countries in the region have overcome in the name of truth, justice and reparations for the victims of recent human rights violations, such as Chile, Peru and Argentina.”
 
The Court´s ruling is available here in Spanish: http://www.corteidh.or.cr/casos.cfm?idCaso=355
Previous press releases in English on this case:
http://cejil.org/en/contenido/maria-claudia-garcia-de-gelman-uruguay
http://cejil.org/en/comunicados/cejil-brings-uruguay-inter-american-court

 
For more information
Contact in Washington D.C
Milli Legrain
CEJIL
Communications Coordinator
(1)-202-319.3000
Mlegrain@cejil.org
 
 

Human rights in the Inter-American system. Compilation of instruments. 2009 edition.

Los Derechos Humanos en el Sistema Interamericano. Compilación de Instrumentos.

El Centro por la Justicia y el Derecho Internacional (CEJIL) se complace en presentar la sexta edición actualizada de su publicación Derechos Humanos en el Sistema Interamericano: Compilación de Instrumentos.

Desde la primera versión de este compendio de normativa interamericana sobre protección y defensa de los derechos humanos –editada en 1997- CEJIL se ha propuesto con esta compilación tornar más accesible a distintos públicos el conocimiento del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos desarrollado en el continente americano, así como el uso de las herramientas que el sistema interamericano (SI) pone a disposición de víctimas y defensores de derechos humanos.

La obra recopila las Declaraciones, Tratados, Protocolos y Principios que conforman la normativa fundamental del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos en el ámbito interamericano, complementándola con aquellos textos que reglamentan la composición y funcionamiento de la Comisión y Corte Interamericana (Estatutos y Reglamentos).

Esta sexta edición actualizada incluye las últimas modificaciones a los Reglamentos de la Comisión y la Corte introducidas en 2009, que afectan a aspectos centrales del Sistema como son las reglas aplicables a la fase de admisibilidad de peticiones, las medidas cautelares de protección, el papel de las víctimas en el litigio ante la Corte Interamericana, o cuestiones de representación legal, entre otras.

Adicionalmente, en esta nueva edición presentamos un cuadro que cumple con la intención de ofrecer de forma ilustrativa un panorama completo acerca del estado de ratificaciones de los instrumentos del sistema interamericano de derechos humanos. A su vez, la forma en que se expone la información permite tener una mirada abarcadora e integral acerca del grado de involucramiento de los Estados miembros de la OEA en el SI.


Type of publication:Compilation of law
Full version available in:
Year: 2009
Your opinion is very important and let us keep up to date ours tools. If you had the chance to use this publication please complete the evaluation form. Thanks in advance.
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